A patient centred, self-management app providing digital support and follow up care for citizens with prostate cancer (2018)

Type of publication:
Conference abstract

Author(s):
*Elves A.; *Dunk S.; *Perry S.; *Srihari N.; Khanduri S.; Redgrave R.; Pope R.

Citation:
Journal of Clinical Urology; Jun 2018; vol. 11 ; p. 26

Abstract:
Introduction: The challenges of increasing cancer survivors, National Survivorship Programme/Recovery package and drive to stratified care combined with funding and workforce constraints require novel approaches to follow-up care. We describe a web-based App facilitating stratified care through remote patient self management for patients undergoing follow-up for prostate cancer. Method: Patients with stable prostate cancer were eligible for recruitment. The App was offered as a replacement to face to face follow-up or for communication and support. App functionalities include remote follow-up, self-reporting of disease/treatment effects, multimedia information/sign posting and secure messaging to a clinical nurse specialist. Outcomes included up-take, use of App functionalities, number of follow-ups delivered, escalations in care and user satisfaction. Results: One hundred and twenty patients identified were eligible for the App. Sixty five patients recruited gen-erated 342 messages and 627 patient self-reported disease/treatment effect entry sessions providing 3036 readings. Sexual health and hormone side effects were most common reported issues.Sixty-six per cent of users were over 69 years. Forty four patients received digital follow-up over the 10 month period. Clinician concerns about disease progression or user lack of internet access or device were the principle obstacle to recruitment. Conclusion: The App was safe and allowed patients to provide feedback upon symptoms, wellbeing and interact proactively with their healthcare team on an ad hoc basis as well as regular follow-up. This fundamental change in approach to delivery of clinical care has wider application to a range of urological conditions.

A pilot experience in using a digital app to follow-up prostate cancer patients in Shropshire, UK (2018)

Type of publication:
Conference abstract

Author(s):
*Phan Y.; *Loh A.; *Anandakumar A.; *Umranikar S.; *Elves A.

Citation:
European Urology, Supplements; Mar 2018; vol. 17 (no. 2)

Abstract:
Introduction & Objective: It is not uncommon for patients with cancer to experience physical, mental and social distress, forming a significant burden that has a negative impact on their quality of life. We have piloted a digital app called VitruCare in our hospital in order to address these issues in patients with prostate cancer. More importantly, the app also serves as a communication tool between the hospital medical team and the patients. Materials and Methods: Patients with prostate cancer were invited to use VitruCare in our pilot study. 53 users were followed prospectively. Data on various domains such as “My Goals”, “My Lifestyle”, “My Priorities”, “My Diaries”, and “How Do I Feel Today” were analysed retrospectively. Results: The users of this application have a median age of 72.5 years old. 14% have nodal or bone metastasis, and median time since treatment is 48 months. 60% have completed the lifestyle questionnaire and “How Do I Feel Today” trackers. 20% of the users who completed the lifestyle questionnaire reported anxiety. 42% have used the diary function and 47% have used the secured messaging function. Usage of the lifestyle questionnaire, “How Do I Feel Today” trackers, secured messaging and diary functions does not appear to be age related. Patients who have been treated and further away from treatment in time are more likely to be used the app. Conclusions: The level of engagement in this pilot study reflects the willingness of patients to utilize this innovative app that has the potential to monitor the well-being of patients with prostate cancer out with the constraints of a fixed clinic appointment.

A pilot experience in using a digital app to follow-up prostate cancer patients in Shropshire, UK (2017)

Type of publication:
Conference abstract

Author(s):
*Phan Y.; *Loh A.; *Anandakumar A.; *Umranikar S.; *Elves A.

Citation:
Journal of Endourology; Sep 2017; vol. 31, S2

Abstract:
Introduction & Objective: It is not uncommon for patients with cancer to experience physical, mental and social distress, forming a significant burden that has a negative impact on their quality of life. We have piloted a digital app called VitruCare in our hospital in order to address these issues in patients with prostate cancer. More importantly, the app also serves as a communication tool between the hospital medical team and the patients. Materials and Methods: Patients with prostate cancer were invited to use VitruCare in our pilot study. 53 users were followed prospectively. Data on various domains such as “My Goals”, “My Lifestyle”, “My Priorities”, “My Diaries”, and “How Do I Feel Today” were analysed retrospectively. Results: The users of this application have a median age of 72.5 years old. 14% have nodal or bone metastasis, and median time since treatment is 48 months. 60% have completed the lifestyle questionnaire and “How Do I Feel Today” trackers. 20% of the users who completed the lifestyle questionnaire reported anxiety. 42% have used the diary function and 47% have used the secured messaging function. Usage of the lifestyle questionnaire, “How Do I Feel Today” trackers, secured messaging and diary functions does not appear to be age related. Patients who have been treated and further away from treatment in time are more likely to be used the app. Conclusions: The level of engagement in this pilot study reflects the willingness of patients to utilize this innovative app that has the potential to monitor the well-being of patients with prostate cancer out with the constraints of a fixed clinic appointment.