Motor neuron disease in otolaryngology – A review (2017)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
*Fussey J.M.; *Skinner D.W.

Citation:
Otorhinolaryngologist; 2017; vol. 10 (no. 2); p. 79-81

Abstract:
Motor neuron disease is an incurable neurodegenerative disorder affecting both upper and lower motor neurons, resulting in progressive weakness and inevitable death due to respiratory failure. Up to 30% of patients present with bulbar symptoms and therefore may be seen first by an otolaryngologist. Furthermore, almost all patients experience bulbar symptoms in the late stages of the disease and may require the input of an otolaryngologist as part of their multidisciplinary management.

Introducing a realistic and reusable quinsy simulator (2016)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
*Giblett, N, *Hari, C

Citation:
The Journal of Laryngology and Otology, Feb 2016, vol. 130, no. 2, p. 201-203

Abstract:
An increasing number of inexperienced doctors are rotating through otolaryngology departments and providing care to ENT patients. Numerous acute ENT conditions require basic surgical or technical intervention; hence, effective and efficient simulation induction training has become paramount in providing a safe yet valuable educational environment for the junior clinician. Whilst simulation has developed over the years for numerous ENT skills, to date there has not been a realistic and easily reproducible model for teaching the skills to manage one of the most common ENT emergencies, a peritonsillar abscess or ‘quinsy’. We have adapted the Laryngotech trainer, a well-established ENT simulation tool, to present a readily accessible, reusable and realistic simulation model. The model provides safe training for the drainage of quinsy.

Practical Otolaryngology for Junior Doctors (2015)

Type of publication:
Book

Author(s):
Thomas Frederick Charles Saunders, Editors: Alistair Mitchell-Innes and *Duncan Bowyer

Citation:
Doctors Academy Publications; 1st edition
ISBN-13: 978-9380573076

Abstract:

This book is designed to guide the junior doctor through an Otolaryngology (ENT) rotation from the first referrals to the practical procedures carried out on a daily basis. ENT departments throughout the world will have different ways of managing particular conditions; however, this book will give the user a framework to deliver good quality clinical care and develop skills with confidence wherever one is working. All information is presented in an easy to digest format to give a handy reference guide on how to manage the hugely varied conditions that are dealt with by Otolaryngology. This makes the book an ideal companion to keep in an on-call bag or clinic room. The advice provided in this book is practical and very clear, with good explanations about simple procedures for settling difficult situations. Information is also provided about looking after patients on the ward following common ENT/Head and Neck operations. An ENT junior doctor should feel more confident quickly after checking through this book for advice, as well as knowing when to escalate a problem to a more knowledgeable senior doctor, if the patient is not improving.

Torrential epistaxis in the third trimester: a management conundrum. (2014)

Author(s):
Crunkhorn RE, *Mitchell-Innes A, Muzaffar J

Citation:
BMJ Case Reports, 2014, vol./is. 2014/, 1757-790X (2014)

Abstract:
Although epistaxis is common during pregnancy, large volume epistaxis is rare. Many standard epistaxis management options are limited in pregnancy due to absolute or relative contraindications. Ear, nose and throat surgeons need to be aware of what options can be used safely and effectively. We present a case of a 32-year-old woman, 32 weeks pregnant, who was admitted with heavy epistaxis refractive to conservative management. Several potential interventions including bismuth iodoform paraffin paste (BIPP) and Floseal were contraindicated or involved additional risk in pregnancy necessitating unorthodox management. This challenging case highlights suitable alternatives for managing large volume epistaxis during pregnancy, as well as discussing the differential diagnosis and relevant investigations. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

Link to full-text: http://casereports.bmj.com/content/2014/bcr-2014-203892.abstract