A rare case of vulval myxoid chondrosarcoma (2015)

Type of publication:
Conference abstract

Author(s):
*Abdelsalam H., *Malcolm A.

Citation:
Journal of Pathology, September 2015, vol./is. 237/(S46)

Abstract:
Introduction: Primary Extraskeletal Myxoid Chondrosaroma (EMC) of the vulva is a rare mesenchymal neoplasm. The myxoid tumour differential diagnosis on a core biopsy can be quite challenging. To date, few cases have been reported in the literature. Case Report: A 42-year old woman noticed a swelling on the right side of the labia, thought to be a Bartholin’s cyst i n 2011. She was managed conservatively. She had drainage and marsupialization under general anaesthesia. This resulted in extreme bruising of the vulva. This was managed with antibiotics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication, and it resolved after 3 weeks. Six months later, the patient presented again with a persistent vulval mass. A biopsy was obtained under general anaesthesia, and it showed a myxoid tumour with differential diagnosis of low grade chondroid tumour. An MRI was performed to assess the extent of the disease. The tumour was excised. At surgery, a 7 x 5 cm lobulated, extremely vascular vulval tumour was found. The tumour was inseparable from the inferior pubic ramus of the pelvic bone. A complete macroscopic resection was obtained. Histology confirmed low grade myxoid chondrosarcoma. Conculsion: Vulval lesions with unusual characteristics or insidious evolution in the labia majora or Bartholin’s glands area should be carefully and pr omptly investigated. Differential diagnosis of myxoid tumours in the vulva should include myxoid chondrosarcoma amongst other diagnoses.

High-grade vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VAIN2/3): comparison of clinical outcomes between treated and untreated patients in an observational cohort study (2015)

Type of publication:
Conference abstract

Author(s):
*Pandey B., *Papoutsis D., *Guttikonda S., *Ritchie J., *Reed N., *Panikkar J., *Blundell S.

Citation:
BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, April 2015, vol./is. 122/(149)

Abstract:
Introduction We aimed to compare the clinical outcomes between treated and untreated patients with high-grade vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VAIN2/3) in our colposcopy unit. Methods The clinical records of all patients diagnosed with VAIN and vaginal cancer over the time period of 1981-2012 were retrieved and reviewed. The primary outcome was to identify the progression of treated versus untreated patients with VAIN2/3 to vaginal cancer and to compare persistent VAIN disease in both subgroups. The secondary outcome was to identify any associations between particular demographic features of treated/ untreated VAIN2/3 patients with their clinical outcome. Results During the time period of this observational cohort study 36 patients of which 11 patients with VAIN1, 19 with VAIN2/3 disease and 6 with vaginal cancer were identified. In those with VAIN2/3 (n = 19) the diagnosis was made in a younger age in the subgroup of treated patients (n = 8) versus the untreated patients (n = 11) (47 +/- 7.1 versus 54.3 +/- 11.5 years old). Nulliparity and smoking status were similar between the two cohorts. The median follow-up for the untreated women was 7 years (range 1-22 years). In the treated VAIN2/3 group, median time from diagnosis to treatment was 4 years (range 0.2-7 years), and median follow-up after treatment was 7 years (range 0.5-18 years). Treatment methods were ablation (n = 4), excision of lesion (n = 2) and vaginectomy (n = 2). There were no cases of treated VAIN2/3 patients (0%) that progressed to vaginal cancer, whereas n = 3 cases of untreated VAIN2/3 patients (21.4%) progressed to vaginal cancer. Following initial VAIN2/3 diagnosis, 8/11 cases of untreated VAIN2/3 (72.7%) had persistent disease as identified in follow-up cytology/colposcopy/vaginal biopsies. In the treated VAIN2/3 patients, 5/5 cases (100%) had persistent disease post-diagnosis but after treatment this decreased to 2/7 cases (28.5%). Conclusion Treated VAIN2/3 patients were of younger age but of similar smoking status and parity in comparison to untreated patients. Three cases of untreated VAIN2/3 progressed to vaginal cancer, whereas there were no such cases of patients receiving treatment for VAIN2/3. The VAIN2/3 patients who received treatment had a higher rate of persistent VAIN disease at followup post-diagnosis (100% versus 72.7%), but after treatment this rate fell down to 28.5%. Further studies are needed to conclude whether treatment of VAIN2/3 disease reduces the rate of VAIN disease persistence and affects the progression to vaginal cancer.

Link to full-text: http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&CSC=Y&NEWS=N&PAGE=fulltext&AN=00134415-201504001-00343&LSLINK=80&D=ovft

Success rate of cold coagulation for the treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia: a retrospective analysis of a series of cases (2015)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
*Parry-Smith W, *Underwood M, De Bellis-Ayres S, *Bangs L, Redman CW, *Panikkar J.

Citation:
Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease, January 2015, vol./is. 19/1(17-21), 1089-2591;1526-0976 (13 Jan 2015)

Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: To establish the cure rate at 1 year of patients who have undergone cold coagulation for the treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN).DESIGN: Retrospective review of data for all patients at Shrewsbury and Telford NHS Trust who had undergone cold coagulation as part of their treatment for CIN between 2001 and 2011. Follow-up data up to December 2012 were analyzed. SETTING: Colposcopy Department, Shrewsbury and Telford NHS Trust, United Kingdom.POPULATION: Women undergoing cold coagulation for the treatment of CIN between 2001 and 2011, with cytologic follow-up until December 2012. METHODS: Patients were identified using a local colposcopy database. Data were obtained via the local histopathology reporting systems. Statistical analyses were performed using Stata/IC 10.1 software. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Posttreatment cytology and whether subsequent treatment was required, with histology results. RESULTS: Data on 557 patients were collected and analyzed. Pre-cold coagulation treatment histologic findings were CIN 1 in 156 patients (28.01%), CIN 2 in 260 patients (46.68%), and CIN 3 in 141 patients (25.31%). The median length of time between cold coagulation treatment and first follow-up smear, used to calculate cure rates at around 1 year, was 406 days (interquartile range 123 days, range 169-3,116 days). The cure rate after cold coagulation was 95.7% at around 1 year. CONCLUSIONS: Cold coagulation has a cure rate comparable to that of excisional treatments such as large loop excision of the transformation zone and should be considered more widely in patients undergoing primary treatment for CIN, where there is no suspicion of invasive disease on history, examination and cytologic results.