Spinal Motocross Injuries in the United Kingdom (2018)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
*Singh, Rohit; Bhalla, Amit; Ockendon, Matthew; *Hay, Stuart

Citation:
Orthopaedic journal of sports medicine; Jan 2018; vol. 6 (no. 1); p.

Abstract:
Background Motocross is a form of motorcycle racing held on established off-road circuits and has been a recreational and competitive sport across the world for >100 years. In the United Kingdom alone, motocross has grown into a phenomenally ambitious and popular franchise. There are >200 motocross clubs across the country, permitting >900 events annually.PurposeTo assess the current trend of spine-related motocross injuries over the past 5 years.Study DesignDescriptive epidemiology study.MethodsData were prospectively collected over 5 years (August 2010-August 2015) at our regional trauma and spine unit, regardless of whether the rider was performing the sport competitively or recreationally. Results During the study period, spine related injuries were identified for 174 patients (age range, 6-75 years) who were directly referred to our department following recreational or competitive motocross, with most injuries being sustained within the early spring and summer months, representing the start of the motocross season. A significant number of injuries were in males (n = 203, 94%), with the majority of injuries occurring within the 21- to 30-year-old age group. A total of 116 (54%) injuries required operative treatment. The most common spinal injury was thoracolumbar burst fracture (n = 95), followed by chance fractures (n = 26).ConclusionThis data series emphasizes the prevalence and devastation of motocross-related spinal injuries in the United Kingdom and may serve in administering sanctions and guidelines to governing bodies of motocross. The spinal injuries that occur during motocross have significant capital connotations for regional spinal centers. The recent surge in motocross popularity is correlated with the number of injuries, which have increased over the past 5 years by almost 500%.

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Plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) as a treatment for high ankle sprain in elite athletes: a randomized control trial (2015)

Type of publication:
Randomised controlled trial

Author(s):
Laver L, *Carmont MR, McConkey MO, Palmanovich E, Yaacobi E, Mann G, Nyska M, Kots E, Mei-Dan O.

Citation:
Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy. 2015 Nov;23(11):3383-92

Abstract:
PURPOSE:
Syndesmotic sprains are uncommon injuries that require prolonged recovery. The influence of ultrasound-guided injections of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) into the injured antero-inferior tibio-fibular ligaments (AITFL) in athletes on return to play (RTP) and dynamic stability was studied.
METHODS:
Sixteen elite athletes with AITFL tears were randomized to a treatment group receiving injections of PRP or to a control group. All patients followed an identical rehabilitation protocol and RTP criteria. Patients were prospectively evaluated for clinical ability to return to full activity and residual pain. Dynamic ultrasound examinations were performed at initial examination and at 6 weeks post-injury to demonstrate re-stabilization of the syndesmosis joint and correlation with subjective outcome.
RESULTS:
All patients presented with a tear to the AITFL with dynamic syndesmosis instability in dorsiflexion-external rotation, and larger neutral tibia-fibula distance on ultrasound. Early diagnosis and treatment lead to shorter RTP, with 40.8 (+/-8.9) and 59.6 (+/-12.0) days for the PRP and control groups, respectively (p = 0.006). Significantly less residual pain upon return to activity was found in the PRP group; five patients (62.5 %) in the control group returned to play with minor discomfort versus one patient in the treatment group (12.5 %). One patient in the control group had continuous pain and disability and subsequently underwent syndesmosis reconstruction.
CONCLUSIONS:
Athletes suffering from high ankle sprains benefit from ultrasound-guided PRP injections with a shorter RTP, re-stabilization of the syndesmosis joint and less long-term residual pain.
LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: II.

Video Q&A: state-of-the-art therapy for the elite and non-elite athlete: an interview with Mike Carmont (2014)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
*Carmont MR

Citation:
BMC Medicine, 2014, vol./is. 12/(8), 1741-7015;1741-7015 (2014)

Abstract:
In this video Q&A, Mr Mike Carmont answers questions about state-of-the-art treatments for elite athletes, and the progress and challenges behind translating these into successful therapies for the non-elite athlete.

Link to more details or full-text: http://europepmc.org/abstract/PMC/PMC3896799