MRI of the Achilles tendon – a comprehensive pictorial review. Part two (2021)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
Szaro P.; Nilsson-Helander K.; *Carmont M.

Citation:
European Journal of Radiology Open; Jan 2021; vol. 8

Abstract:
The most common disorder affecting the Achilles tendon is midportion tendinopathy. A focal fluid signal indicates microtears, which may progress to partial and complete rupture. Assessment of Achilles tendon healing should be based on tendon morphology and tension rather than structural signal. After nonoperative management or surgical repair of the Achilles tendon, areas of fluid signal is pathologic because it indicates re-rupture. A higher signal in the postoperative Achilles tendon is a common finding and is present for a prolonged period following surgical intervention and needs to be interpreted alongside the clinical appearance.

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MRI of the Achilles tendon-A comprehensive pictorial review. Part one (2021)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
Szaro P.; Nilsson-Helander K.; *Carmont M.

Citation:
European Journal of Radiology Open; Jan 2021; vol. 8

Abstract:
The normal Achilles tendon is composed of twisted subtendons separated by thin high signal septae, which are a potential pitfall on MRI because they mimic a tendon tear. Tendinopathy and full thickness tears may be assessed effectively both on MRI and ultrasound. MRI is superior to ultrasound in detection of partial tears and for postoperative assessment. The use of fat suppression sequences allows the ability to detect focal lesions. Sagittal and coronal sections are useful for assessing the distance between stumps of a ruptured tendon. Sequences with contrast are indicated in postoperative investigations and suspicion of infection, arthritis or tumor. MRI may reveal inflammatory changes with minor symptoms long before the clinical manifestations of seronegative spondyloarthropathy. The most common non-traumatic focal lesion of the Achilles tendon is Achilles tendon xanthoma, which is manifested by intermediate or slightly higher signal on T1- and T2-weighted images compared to that in the normal Achilles tendon. Other tumors of the Achilles tendon are very rare, whereas the involvement of the tendon from tumor in adjacent structures is more frequent. The novel MRI sequences may help to detect disorders of the Achilles tendon more specifically before clinical manifestation. Regeneration or remodeling of the Achilles tendon can be non-invasively detected and monitored in diffusion tensor imaging. Assessment of healing is possible using T2-mapping while evaluating the tendon vascularization in intravoxel incoherent motion MRI.

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Is pain properly managed in children presenting with fractures? A retrospective audit of children presenting to the emergency department (2020)

Type of publication:
Conference abstract

Author(s):
*Rafie A

Citation:
British Journal of Surgery; Jun 2020; vol. 107 ; p. 68

Abstract:
Aim: Pain is a common problem in the surgical field, especially when treating children – but how well is it managed, and documented? In this audit we aim to answer a few key questions. Is analgesia administered prehospital? Are pain scores recorded, and re-evaluated? And is analgesia offered and/or administered in the Emergency Department(ED)? Method: A retrospective audit was carried out between two hospitals on 100 patients aged between 5-15 presenting to the ED. A search was carried out using SNOMEDand ICD10 codes, to find patients presenting with fractures – and the ED CAS cards reviewed.
Result(s): The data showed poor compliance between both hospitals – pain scores were seldom recorded, or reevaluated; and in 58% of cases analgesia was not offered and no reason was documented. 28% of patients were given pre-hospital analgesia and only 2% of patients had an analgesia review.
Conclusion(s): Adequate pain management is vital, especially in children – as they often don’t self-report pain. The study found that the worst compliance was in documentation of pain scores, and their re-evaluation. However, more concerningly analgesia was only administered in 19% of cases – and in many cases there was no documentation as to why it wasn’t offered.

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Boat propeller transection of hemithorax-successful multidisciplinary surgical reconstruction (2020)

Type of publication:
Conference abstract

Author(s):
*Cheruvu S.; Oo K.T.M.; Erel E.; Satur C.

Citation:
British Journal of Surgery; Jun 2020; vol. 107 ; p. 37

Abstract:
A 69 year old man fell into canal and was drawn into the propeller of his canal boat that resulted in transection of the right thoracic cavity and the right upper arm. Emergency helicopter transfer was made to our major trauma centre for multidisciplinary surgical care. Injuries included a full thickness antero-posterior transection from the sternum to beyond the tip of the scapula, and an open right midshaft humeral fracture with wound extending obliquely into the axilla. The entire thoracic cavity was contaminated by canal water. There was severe haemodynamic and cardiorespiratory compromise requiring level 3 intensive care. Following emergency resuscitative management, multidisciplinary surgical care was provided by the cardiothoracic, plastic and orthopaedic surgery teams utilising innovative operative techniques. Multistage operative management of chest wall required initial damage control surgery with debridement and negative pressure therapy. After 4 days of intensive care physiological stabilisation, reconstruction of the thoracic defect was undertaken with specialist thoracic titanium implants and the chest wall was reconstructed. This was a major thoracic trauma case treated successfully using revolutionary surgical techniques at the Royal Stoke Hospital. The subsequent impact on practice for thoracic polytrauma has led to improved survival rates by 75%.

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Rothia mucilaginosa: a case of septic arthritis in a native knee and review of the literature (2021)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
*Daoub, Ahmed; *Ansari, Hamza; *Orfanos, George; *Barnett, Andrew

Citation:
BMJ case reports; Jan 2021; vol. 14 (no. 1)

Abstract:
Rothia mucilaginosa is a Gram-positive aerobic coccus usually found in the oral and respiratory tract. Septic arthritis is an uncommon condition, but is an orthopaedic emergency. A rare case of knee septic arthritis due to R. mucilaginosa is presented. Patient management and outcomes are discussed, and learning points from this case are outlined to help manage any further cases that may arise.

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Do the heel-rise test and isometric strength improve after Achilles tendon repair using Dresden technique? (2021)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
De la Fuente, Carlos; Henriquez, Hugo; *Carmont, Michael R; Huincahue, Javiera; Paredes, Tamara; Tapia, María; Araya, Juan Pablo; Díaz, Nicolás; Carpes, Felipe P

Citation:
Foot and ankle surgery : official journal of the European Society of Foot and Ankle Surgeons; Jan 2021 [epub ahead of print]

Abstract:
BACKGROUND Achilles’ tendon ruptures result in impaired plantar flexion strength and endurance. It is interesting to know the plantar flexion strength, the number of heel-rise repetitions, and the maximal calf circumference following Achilles’ tendon ruptures repair. METHODS Both the injured and non-injured legs of thirty male patients with Achilles’ tendon ruptures treated with the percutaneous Dresden technique were compared with the ankle function of 30 healthy participants. Rehabilitation involved partial weight-bearing for three weeks and then increased to full weight-bearing and ankle exercises. RESULTS The injured legs had weaker plantar flexion strength (1.64 ± 0.17 Nm/kg) compared with the non-injured legs (1.91 ± 0.24 Nm/kg; p = 0.002) and the healthy participants’ legs (1.93 ± 0.32 Nm/kg; p < 0.001). The non-injured leg had greater ability in doing heel-rise repetitions (39.4 ± 6.1 rep.) compared with the injured legs (37.2 ± 5.7 rep.; p < 0.023) and the healthy participants’ legs (31.0 ± 13.0 rep.; p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS The injured leg had not recovered full isometric strength but had improved heel-rise repetition.

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No difference in Achilles Tendon Resting Angle, Patient-reported outcome or Heel-rise height Index between Non- and Early-weightbearing the First Year after an Achilles Tendon Rupture (2020)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
*Carmont M; Brorsson, A.; Karlsson, J.; Nilsson-Helander, K.

Citation:
Muscles, Ligaments & Tendons Journal (MLTJ); Oct 2020; vol. 10 (no. 4); p. 651-658

Abstract:
Background. Patient-reported outcome scores and comparable re-rupture rates in randomized controlled trials have not shown a definitive benefit for operative treatment after acute Achilles tendon rupture. This, together with the increasing rupture rates in the older age group has led to non-operative treatment being increasingly used. Objective. This study aimed to determine the variation in Achilles Tendon Resting Angle (ATRA) together with patient reported and functional outcome, with non-operative management of the ruptured Achilles tendon using two different regimes, which have been shown to offer low re-rupture rates. Methods. This is a non-randomised cohort comparison of Achilles tendon rupture patients managed with Non-Weight-Bearing (NWB) for 6 weeks vs. Early Weight-Bearing (EWB). The NWB-group received a cast in plantar flexion for 2 weeks followed by 6 weeks in a controlled ankle motion boot with incremental diminishing plantar flexion. The EWB-group received an initial anterior protective plaster slab in plantar flexion followed by 6 weeks of weight-bearing on the meta-tarsal heads, with an anterior shell restricting dorsiflexion. Results. At 12 months after the injury there were no differences in any of the variables between the two treatment groups. The NWB-group compared to the EWB-group reported at mean (SD) for ATRA -9.8° (4.6°) versus -11.4° (5°), p=0.32, for Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) 87 (10) versus 79 (19), p=0.43 and for Heel-Rise Height Index (HRHI) 71% (19%) versus 59% (13%), p=0.13. Conclusions. The two methods of non-operative treatment studied lead to increased relative ATRA following injury, however, patients report only minor limitation in terms of outcome. Patients had almost a third less heel-rise height compared with the non-injured ankle.

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Clinical Orthopaedic Teaching programme for Students (COTS) (2020)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
Kumar P.R.; Stubley T.; Hashmi Y.; *Ahmed U.

Citation:
Postgraduate Medical Journal; 2020 [epub ahead of print]

Abstract:
Introduction: There is a huge variation in the depth and breadth of content taught regarding orthopaedic examinations. Undergraduate students are often confused by the variability in examination teaching, therefore increasing concerns for upcoming objectively structured clinical examinations (OSCEs). Doctors, despite being expected to teach, rarely receive formal preparation, with only a handful of institutions providing necessary training. The Clinical Orthopaedic Teaching programme for Students (COTS) was designed to equip medical students with the knowledge to perform orthopaedic examinations and to synergistically provide senior students with the necessary experience for the future teaching required of them. Method(s): Six fortnightly sessions were delivered, each focusing on a specific joint examination. Student and tutor recruitment were voluntary. Pre-session and post-session multiple-choice questions (MCQs) were provided to students to assess improvement in knowledge. Anonymous feedback forms were provided to both students and tutors. Result(s): From 61 student responses, 98.4% of students stated that COTS met the learning outcomes, with content relevant for their medical curriculum. 96.7% supported COTS’ near-peer teaching (NPT) style for OSCE preparation. Based on a five-point Likert scale, students displayed a mean improvement in confidence (1.7+/-1.2, p<0.001) and MCQ scores (1.3+/-1.2, p<0.001). All 10 tutors perceived an improvement of their teaching skills and confidence to teach (1.0+/-0.9, p=0.016). Conclusion(s): COTS shows that an NPT style can be used to effectively teach orthopaedic examinations, with benefits for students and tutors. With our aim to refine and upscale this programme, we publish our pilot study findings to encourage similar teaching programmes to be adopted at other universities.

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The reliability, reproducibility and utilization of the radiographic Achilles Tendon Loading Angle in the management of Achilles Tendon rupture (2020)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
*Carmont M.R.; *Littlehales J.; Brorsson A.; Karlsson J.; Nilsson-Helander K.; Barfod K.W.; Ginder L.

Citation:
Foot and Ankle Surgery; 2020 Oct 3;S1268-7731

Abstract:
Background: During management of Achilles tendon rupture, determination of tendon-end approximation, either clinically or by ultrasound is difficult, following brace application of during loading. The Radiographic Achilles Tendon Loading Angle (RadATLA) is proposed as a method of measuring ankle position whilst loading in a brace during the management of Achilles tendon rupture. This study aims to determine the reliability and reproducibility of the RadATLA. Method(s): A loaded true lateral ankle radiograph including the fifth metatarsal head was taken when wearing a brace at the 6-week time point in 18 patients (19 ankles). following Achilles tendon repair or reconstruction. The RadATLA was compared with the Tibio-talar angle, other radiographic and clinical measures used to quantify foot and ankle position during the first 6 weeks of early rehabilitation in a resting position and during loading. Result(s): The intra-rater reliability of both angles was found to be good (>0.8). The RadATLA was found to have an excellent intra-rater reliability with Intra-class correlation of (ICC) 0.992-0.996 (95%CI 0.889-0.999), standard error of the measurement (SEM) 1.03-3.65 and Minimal Detectable Change (MDC) 2.86-10.12. The inter-rater reliability was good with ICC of 0.798-0.969 (95%CI-0.03 to 0.964), SEM 2.9-7.6, and MDC 8.1-20.9. The RadATLA loaded at 6 weeks in all patients was at mean (SD) (range) 41.9 (16.5), (18.5-75.9). There was a significant difference between the patients in the Repair group compared with patients in the Reconstruction group both in RadATLA loaded at 6 weeks: 35.6 (11.2), (18.5-56.5) versus 55.5 (19), (20-75.9), (p = 0.01). The amount loaded in all patients was at mean (SD) (range) 29.2Kg (17.7), (2-56) and the percentage Body Weight was 30.7% (19), (2.1-63.2). There were no differences between the groups neither in amount loaded nor in percentage Body weight (p = 0.614-0.651). Conclusion(s): The RadATLA is a reliable and reproducible angle and can be used to determine the position of the ankle, when loaded in a brace during rehabilitation following Achilles tendon rupture.

Age and Tightness of Repair Are Predictors of Heel-Rise Height After Achilles Tendon Rupture (2020)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
*Carmont, Michael R.; Zellers, Jennifer A.; Brorsson, Annelie; Nilsson-Helander, Katarina; Karlsson, Jón; Grävare Silbernagel, Karin

Citation:
Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine; Mar 2020; vol. 8 (no. 3); p. 1-8

Abstract:
Background: Achilles tendon rupture leads to weakness of ankle plantarflexion. Treatment of Achilles tendon rupture should aim to restore function while minimizing weakness and complications of management. Purpose: To determine the influence of factors (age, sex, body mass index [BMI], weight, time from injury to operative repair, and tightness of repair) in the initial surgical management of patients after an acute Achilles tendon rupture on 12-month functional outcome assessment after percutaneous and minimally invasive repair. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: From May 2012 to January 2018, patients sustaining an Achilles tendon rupture receiving operative repair were prospectively evaluated. Tightness of repair was quantified using the intraoperative Achilles tendon resting angle (ATRA). Heel-rise height index (HRHI) was used as the primary 12-month outcome variable. Secondary outcome measures included Achilles tendon total rupture score (ATRS) and Tegner score. Stepwise multiple regression was used to create a model to predict 12-month HRHI. Results: A total of 122 patients met the inclusion criteria for data analysis (mean ± SD age, 44.1 ± 10.8 years; 78% male; mean ± SD BMI, 28.1 ± 4.3 kg/m2). The elapsed time to surgery was 6.5 ± 4.0 days. At 12-month follow-up, patients had an HRHI of 82% ± 16% and performed 82% ± 17% of repetitions compared with the noninjured side. Participants had a mean ATRS of 87 ± 15 and a median Tegner score of 5 (range, 1-9), with a reduction in Tegner score of 2 from preinjury levels. The relative ATRA at 12 months was –4.8° ± 3.9°. Multiple regression identified younger age (B = ±0.006; P <.001) and greater intraoperative ATRA (B = 0.005; P =.053) as predictors of more symmetrical 12-month HRHI (R 2 = 0.19; P <.001; n = 120). Conclusion: Age was found to be the strongest predictor of outcome after Achilles tendon rupture. The most important modifiable risk factor was the tightness of repair. It is recommended that repair be performed as tight as possible to optimize heel-rise height 1 year after Achilles tendon rupture and possibly to reduce tendon elongation.

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