Masseter muscle defined sarcopenia and survival in head and neck cancer patients. (2022)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
*McGoldrick D.M.; *Yassin Alsabbagh A.; *Shaikh M.; *Pettit L.; *Bhatia S.K.;

Citation:
British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. 60(4) (pp 454-458), 2022. Date of Publication: May 2022.

Abstract:
Sarcopenia is increasingly recognised as a poor prognostic factor in older patients undergoing cancer treatment. Recently, masseter muscle cross sectional area (MMCSA) has been shown to accurately identify sarcopenic patients. We aimed to apply this novel technique to a head and neck cohort to identify any potential relationship with survival. A retrospective review was undertaken of patients over 65 years, diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and treated with curative intent in our unit between October 2009 and October 2017. MMCSA was measured on staging CT scans using a validated technique. Patients were categorised into tertiles and also high and low MMCSA groups based on gender based tertile and mean MMCSA values. Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression methods. A total of 111 patients were included in the study. The average age was 74 years (range 65-92 years) and 69% were male. The majority of patients had malignancies of the oral cavity (41%) or larynx (37%). The overall survival was 46% with a follow-up between 24 and 60 months. MMCSA was significantly associated with worse overall survival when defined using a gender based mean cut-off point (p=0.038) or tertile groupings (p=0.026), but did not maintain significance in multivariable analysis. Masseter muscle defined sarcopenia was associated with worse survival in our cohort in univariate analysis. Opportunistic measurement of this new factor on staging scans may aid prognostication and management in older patients.

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Reducing intra-hospital telephone communication time using app technology (2020)

Type of publication:
Conference abstract

Author(s):
*Hamid M.

Citation:
BMJ Leader. Conference: Leaders in Healthcare Conference 2020. Virtual. 4(Supplement 1) (pp A42), 2020. Date of Publication: November 2020.

Abstract:
Background Lengthy switchboard waiting times result in delayed communication between healthcare professionals in a hospital. Wasted time impedes patient care, costs the Trust a substantial financial sum and impacts healthcare professional's morale. Aim(s): To reduce intra-hospital telecommunication time utilising the Induction phone application, an easy to use, regularly updated telephone directory. Method(s): Initial audit: Five chosen specialities were contacted between 9-10 AM from the Emergency department for 2 consecutive weeks. The time taken to reach each speciality via switchboard was recorded. A survey seeking the number of calls made per day, the preferred method of contact and the feelings associated with telephone waiting times was sent to department doctors. PDSA cycle 1: One-month application advertisement and re-audit. PDSA2: Eye-catching tele-directory board with the most used extensions and bleeps displayed in the department. Satisfaction survey sent post PDSA2. Sustainability: New doctors were provided induction information. Result(s): Initial average waiting time via switchboard was 48 seconds. The average calls made per doctor each day was 12. This calculated to a total departmental loss of 20.16 hours per week waiting on the phone, equating an annual loss of 26, 208. PDSA1: Average waiting times reduced to 12 seconds utilising the application; saving an estimate ~19,656 per annum. PDSA2: Instant availability of contact details on the display board further reduced waiting times to an average 6 seconds. 84% of doctors (n=16) disliked waiting more than 20 seconds, with associated feelings of frustration. 100% preferred the display board, then the use of the application before resorting to switchboard. 100% Sustainability was recorded one year later. Conclusion(s): The use of application technology reduces wasted time which hampers patient care; reduces Trust running costs; and improves health care professional's morale at work.

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High-fidelity simulation on shoulder dystocia management in Greek Midwives: the SAFE study (2022)

Type of publication:
Conference abstract

Author(s):
*Papoutsis D.; Klazoglou P.; Valasoulis G.

Citation:
BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Conference: Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists World Congress, RCOG 2022. London United Kingdom. 129(Supplement 1) (pp 128), 2022. Date of Publication: June 2022.

Abstract:
Objective: The SAFE study is funded from the Hellenic Foundation for Research and Innovation and its primary objective is to explore and quantify how the knowledge and skills on shoulder dystocia management of Greek Midwives may improve following high-fidelity simulation. Design(s): A high-fidelity simulator that consisted of a pelvic model and a computerised neonatal mannequin with a built in force-monitoring system was utilised for the purposes of shoulder dystocia management in a one-day workshop. Registered midwives were invited to participate in groups of five in a 90-min training session during the workshop. Method(s): The training session consisted of a 30-minute initial assessment, a 30-minute theoretical and hands-on training from the instructor, and a 30-minute final assessment of participants. The outcomes measured involved the performance of maneuvers, the force applied on the neonatal head, the level of communication skills and self-reported confidence. These outcomes were recorded at the start and end of the training session. The checklist of performance involved 20 items in accordance with the RCOG guideline on shoulder dystocia. The force applied on the neonatal head was recorded with the force-monitoring system of the simulator. The communication skills and the self reported confidence of participants were measured on a numerical scale. The pre-and after-training scores of all four outcomes were compared and statistical analysis was applied. Result(s): There were n = 6 one-day workshops with 81 midwives participating in total (October-November 2021). Their mean age was 30.6 +/- 11.1 years old (median:25 years). Prior to training, only 6/81 (7.4%) managed to successfully deliver the impacted shoulder (defined as successful delivery of the posterior arm), with this increasing to 77/81 (95%) after training. The force applied to the neonatal head was similar pre-and after-training (pre:102.20 +/- 38.1 Newtons vs after: 102.13 +/- 27.7 Newtons), with a convergence of the outliers to the mean value. Performance scores (scale:0- 20) improved significantly almost three-fold (pre:5.75 +/- 3.8 vs after:15.63 +/- 2.5), and the self-reported confidence of participants (scale:0-10) increased almost two-fold (pre:3.2 +/- 1.9 vs after: 7.8 +/- 1.4). The communication skills of the participants (scale:0-5) also improved (pre: 2.90 +/- 1.1 vs after: 4.78 +/- 0.5). Those with the most improvement in their confidence were the participants with less clinical experience (r = ?0.329, p = 0.03). Conclusion(s): High-fidelity simulation on the management of shoulder dystocia at childbirth, even after a single training session, can significantly improve the performance score of maneuvers, the levels of confidence and the communication skills of Midwives.

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Switchboard Care Co-Ordination (2022)

Type of publication:
Service improvement case study

Author(s):
*Paul Corbett, Care Co-ordination Team (Shropdoc), Sharon Clennell, *Switchboard

Citation:
SaTH Improvement Hub, March 2022

Abstract:
In order to improve the time taken to connect clinical teams from SaTH and the Care Co-ordination teams, a new system called netcall was trialled. This reduced the burden on the SaTH switchboard and released time for directing other calls.

Link to PDF poster [no password required]

Discharge Lounge RSH (2022)

Type of publication:
Service improvement case study

Author(s):
*Hannah Adkins, *Elishia Carter, *Liam Allman-Evitts

Citation:
SaTH Improvement Hub, April 2022

Abstract:
In order to facilitate early flow from the front door areas, a permanent discharge lounge and team were implemented which had positive impact on pre-12 discharges at RSH

Link to PDF poster [no password required]

Improved efficiency and safety Chest Drain boxes (2022)

Type of publication:
Service improvement case study

Author(s):
*Leanne Barkess, *Shirley Pickstock, *Jackie Jones

Citation:
SaTH Improvement Hub, February 2022

Abstract:
Chest Drain kits are no longer available to order and the medical team spend time locating the equipment needed to perform pleural procedures. The equipment is often not easily accessible, and the team frequently have to leave the ward to gather the required kit. As part of the improvement, a chest drain kit was created using Set-Up Reduction.

Link to PDF poster [no password required]

Factors affecting womens' sexual function during the first-year after childbirth in Greece (2022)

Type of publication:Conference abstract

Author(s):Haritopoulou E.; Papatheodorou D.; Nitsa E.; Antonakou A.; *Papoutsis D.

Citation:BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Conference: Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists World Congress, RCOG 2022. London United Kingdom. 129(Supplement 1) (pp 204), 2022. Date of Publication: June 2022.

Abstract:Objective: Sexual dysfunction after childbirth has been related to the number of vaginal births, the mode of delivery, and to the severity of perineal trauma. The present cross-sectional study was designed to identify the factors that affect the quality of sexual function during the first year after delivery in Greek women. <Design(s): We constructed an 81-item questionnaire that was posted online via the social media for the time period of February-April 2021. Women residing in Greece who had delivered more than 4 weeks ago but not more than 12 months ago were considered eligible for the study. Method(s): Data that was collected included patients' demographics, and data regarding their labour and childbirth. Information on their sexual life before, during and after pregnancy was also collected and the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) was used to quantify the sexual function of women during the 4 weeks prior to answering the questionnaire (score range:0-36, with a score of 26 or less indicating sexual dysfunction). After data collection was completed statistical analysis was applied. Result(s): In total there were 441 women responding to the questionnaire with a mean age of 32.5+/-4.4 years old. Approximately half of women delivered 6 months ago and 55.2% were first time mothers. The caesarean section rate in the total sample was 47.9%, and only 34.2% had a spontaneous onset vaginal birth. At childbirth, more than 85% of women sustained perineal trauma, of which 39.3% had an episiotomy. During pregnancy 76% of women had sexual intercourse with their partners, with half of them having a frequency of 2-3 times a month. The mean score of the FSFI index in the total sample was 21.8 +/- 10.7. There was a significant correlation of sexual dysfunction postpartum with exclusive breastfeeding, with increasing maternal age, with reduced number of sleeping hours, with the limited support from their family environment, and with the presence of incontinence. Conversely, the increased frequency of sexual intercourse before and during pregnancy was correlated with a higher score of sexual function postpartum. Perineal trauma, a high body mass index, smoking, and the mode of delivery did not seem to affect the sexual function after delivery. Conclusion(s): We have identified factors that seem to modify the sexual function of Greek women postpartum. These factors should be taken in consideration when providing midwifery care to women after birth.

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Exploring pregnant women's experiences of stopping smoking with an incentive scheme with 'enhanced' support: a qualitative study (2022)

Type of publication:Journal article

Author(s):McCormack F.C.; Hopley R.C.; Boath E.H.; Parry S.L.; Roscoe S.M.; Stewart A.; *Birch V.A.

Citation:Perspectives in Public Health. 2022. [epub ahead of print]

Abstract:Aim: This study aims to understand pregnant women's experiences of smoking cessation with an incentive scheme in a deprived UK city. This is important because smoking cessation with pregnant women is one of the most crucial public health initiatives to promote, and is particularly challenging in deprived areas. While financial incentive schemes are controversial, there is a need to better understand pregnant women's experiences. The scheme combined quasi-financial incentives (shopping vouchers) for validated quits (carbon monoxide (CO) validated at < 10 ppm), enhanced support from smoking cessation advisors, the opportunity to identify a 'Significant Other Supporter' and nicotine replacement therapy. Method(s): With the focus on understanding pregnant women's experiences, a qualitative design was adopted. Semi-structured interviews were completed with 12 pregnant women from the scheme, and the three advisors. All interviews were transcribed, and thematic analysis conducted. Result(s): Pregnant women reported various challenges to quitting, including long-established routines, and stress. Participants were aware of stigma around incentives but were all very positive about the scheme. The relationship with advisors was described as fundamental. The women valued their advice and support, while uptake of the 'Significant Other Supporter' appeared low. Participants viewed the CO monitoring as 'an incentive', while the vouchers were framed as a 'bonus'. Advisors perceived the vouchers as helping engage pregnant women and maintain quit status, and women appreciated the vouchers both as financial assistance and recognition of their accomplishments. Conclusion(s): This study highlights the great value women placed on the support, advice and monitoring from specialist advisors. The distinction between vouchers as a welcomed bonus, rather than 'the incentive' to engage, is important. How smoking cessation and schemes to promote this are communicated to pregnant women and health professionals is important, particularly given the stigma and controversy involved.

Link to full-text [manuscript]

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Not All That Glows Is Malignant: Actinomycosis as a Rare Mimic of Lung Cancer (2022)

Type of publication:Conference abstract

Author(s):*Ekhelikar S.; Muthusami R.; *Orme R.; *Ahmad N.

Citation:American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. Conference: International Conference of the American Thoracic Society, ATS 2022. San Francisco, CA United States. 205(1) (no pagination), 2022.

Abstract:Introduction: Pulmonary actinomycosis is a rare bacterial infection that can mimic malignant and chronic suppurative lung conditions, and therefore is often misdiagnosed initially as one of the more common differential diagnoses. The challenge lies in diagnosing this condition prior to surgery as it is completely curable with antibiotics. Case description: A 48 year old man, cigarette smoker and previous intravenous drug user, presented with exertional breathlessness, persistent cough and night sweats. There was no fever or weight loss. A Chest Xray (CXR) and Computerised Tomography (CT) scan showed a left upper lobe cavitating lesion leading to differential diagnoses of bronchogenic malignancy and tuberculosis (TB). A Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scan confirmed a fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) avid left upper lobe cavitating lesion with enlarged FDG avid thoracic lymphadenopathy. Bronchoscopy and Endobronchial Ultrasound (EBUS) were nondiagnostic. He underwent left upper lobectomy with histopathology confirming Pulmonary actinomycosis and was commenced on Amoxicillin treatment. <br/>Discussion(s): Pulmonary actinomycosis is the third most common type of actinomycosis, behind cervicofacial and abdominal, constituting 15% of total cases. It can occur at all ages, but most case series describe a peak incidence in the 4th and 5th decades. Symptoms are non-specific and often mimic those of it's more common differentials as above and so diagnosing this condition early presents a challenge. Basic laboratory tests reflect the non-specific inflammatory nature of the disease. Imaging modalities (CXR, CT, PET) are helpful, but not diagnostic. The gold standard for diagnosis remains histological examination & bacterial culture of lung biopsy specimen. Histopathologic evidence of granulomas containing neutrophils and sulfur granules with Actinomyces colonies are the hallmark of actinomycosis. Recent data suggests it is increasingly possible to avoid unwarranted surgical procedures, by performing bronchoscopic and percutaneous biopsy techniques. These represent the best chance at preventing unnecessary surgery and should be pursued as they can help exclude malignancy. Penicillin remains the drug of choice for Pulmonary actinomycosis and with correct treatment, the prognosis is excellent. However, those with complications may still require surgery. The chief challenge with Pulmonary actinomycosis is identifying it early, because it is rare, and it also mimics diseases like lung cancer and TB often. We were unable to exclude malignancy with pre-surgical diagnostics and so our patient had surgery. However, clinicians should be aware and consider Pulmonary actinomycosis as an important differential when investigating cavitating lung lesions as diagnosing it early could help prevent physical and psychological morbidity, including unwarranted surgery. (Figure Presented).

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Outcomes after perioperative SARS-CoV-2 infection in patients with proximal femoral fractures: An international cohort study (2021)

Type of publication:Journal article

Author(s):Ward A.E.; Nepogodiev D.; Ahmed I.; Chaudhry D.; Dhaif F.; Bankhad-Kendall B.; Mahmood A.; Marais L.; Metcalfe A.; Parsons N.; Siaw-Acheampong K.; Dawson B.E.; Evans J.P.; Glasbey J.C.; Gujjuri R.R.; Heritage E.; Jones C.S.; Kamarajah S.K.; Keatley J.M.; Li E.; McKay S.C.; Pellino G.; Tiwari A.; Simoes J.F.F.; Trout I.M.; Venn M.L.; Wilkin R.J.W.; Ademuyiwa A.O.; Agarwal A.; Al Ameer E.; Alderson D.; Arnaud A.P.; Augestad K.M.; BankheadKendall B.; Benson R.A.; Chakrabortee S.; Blanco-Colino R.; Brar A.; Minaya Bravo A.; Breen K.A.; Lima Buarque I.; Caruana E.; Cunha M.F.; Di Saverio S.; Elhadi M.; Farik S.; Fiore M.; Fitzgerald J.E.; Gallo G.; Ghosh D.; Gomes G.M.A.; Hutchinson P.; Isik A.; Lawani I.; Lederhuber H.; Leventoglu S.; Loffler M.W.; Mazingi D.; Mohan H.; Moore R.; Moszkowicz D.; Ng-Kamstra J.S.; Metallidis S.; Moug S.; Niquen M.; Ntirenganya F.; Outani O.; Pata F.; Pinkney T.D.; Pockney P.; Radenkovic D.; Ramos-De La Medina A.; Roberts K.; Santos I.; Schache A.; Schnitzbauer A.; Shaw R.; Shu S.; Soreide K.; Spinelli A.; Sundar S.; Tabiri S.; Townend P.; Tsoulfas G.; Van Ramshorst G.; Wright N.; Mak J.K.C.; Kulkarni R.; Sharma N.; Nankivell P.; Tirotta F.; Parente A.; Breik O.; Kisiel A.; Cato L.D.; Saeed S.; Bhangu A.; Griffiths E.; Pathanki A.M.; Ford S.; Desai A.; Almond M.; Kamal M.; Chebaro A.; Lecolle K.; Truant S.; El Amrani M.; Zerbib P.; Pruvot F.R.; Mathieu D.; Surmei E.; Mattei L.; Dudek J.; Singhal T.; El-Hasani S.; Nehra D.; Walters A.; Cuschieri J.; Davidson G.H.; Ho M.; Wade R.G.; Johnstone J.; Bourke G.; Brunelli A.; Elkadi H.; Otify M.; Pompili C.; Burke J.R.; Bagouri E.; Chowdhury M.; Abual-Rub Z.; Kaufmann A.; Munot S.; Lo T.; Young A.; Kowal M.; Wall J.; PeckhamCooper A.; Winter S.C.; Belcher E.; Stavroulias D.; Di Chiara F.; Wallwork K.; Qureishi A.; Lami M.; Sravanam S.; Shah K.; Chidambaram S.; Smillie R.; Shaw A.V.; Bandyopadhyay S.; Cernei C.; Bretherton C.; Jeyaretna D.; Ganau M.; Piper R.J.; Duck E.; Brown S.; Jelley C.; Tucker S.C.; Bond-Smith G.; Griffin X.L.; Tebala G.D.; Neal N.; Vatish M.; Noton T.M.; Ghattaura H.; Maher M.; Fu H.; Risk O.B.F.; Soleymani Majd H.; Sinha S.; Aggarwal A.; Kharkar H.; Lakhoo K.; Verberne C.; Mastoridis S.; Senent-Boza A.; Sanchez-Arteaga A.; Benitez-Linero I.; Manresa-Manresa F.; Tallon-Aguilar L.; Melero-Cortes L.; FernandezMarin M.R.; Duran-Munoz-Cruzado V.M.; Ramallo-Solis I.; Beltran-Miranda P.; Pareja-Ciuro F.; Anton-Eguia B.T.; Dawson A.C.; Drane A.; Oliva Mompean F.; GomezRosado J.; Reguera-Rosal J.; Valdes-Hernandez J.; Capitan-Morales L.; Del Toro Lopez M.D.; Tang A.; Beamish A.J.; Price C.; Bosanquet D.; Magowan D.; Solari F.; Williams G.; Nassa H.; Smith L.; Elliott L.; McCabe G.; Holroyd D.; Jamieson N.B.; Mariani N.M.; Nicastro V.; Li Z.; Parkins K.; Spencer N.; Harries R.; Egan R.J.; Motter D.; Jenvey C.; Mahoney R.; Fine N.; Minto T.; Henry A.; Gill C.; Dunne N.; Sarma D.R.; Godbole C.; Carlos W.; Tewari N.; Jeevan D.; Naredla P.; Khajuria A.; Connolly H.; Robertson S.; Sweeney C.; Di Taranto G.; Shanbhag S.; Dickson K.; McEvoy K.; Skillman J.; Sait M.; Al-Omishy H.; Baig M.; Heer B.; Lunevicius R.; Sheel A.R.G.; Sundhu M.; Santini A.J.A.; Fathelbab M.S.A.T.; Hussein K.M.A.; Nunes Q.M.; Jones R.P.; Shahzad K.; Haq I.; Baig M.M.A.S.; Hughes J.L.; Kattakayam A.; Rajput K.; Misra N.; Shah S.B.; Clynch A.L.; Georgopoulou N.; Sharples H.M.; Apampa A.A.; Nzenwa I.C.; Sud A.; Podolsky D.; Coleman N.L.; Callahan M.P.; Dunstan M.; Beak P.; Gerogiannis I.; Ebrahim A.; Alwadiya A.; Goyal A.; Phillips A.; Bhalla A.; Demetriou C.; Grimley E.; Theophilidou E.; Ogden E.; Malcolm F.L.; Davies-Jones G.; Ng J.C.K.; Mirza M.; Hassan M.; Elmaleh N.; Daliya P.; Bateman A.; Chia Z.; A'Court J.; Konarski A.; Faulkner G.; Talwar R.; Patel K.; Askari A.; Jambulingam P.S.; Shaw S.; Maity A.; Hatzantonis C.; Sagar J.; Kudchadkar S.; Cirocchi N.; Chan C.H.; Eberbach H.; Bayer J.; Erdle B.; Sandkamp R.; Kaafarani H.; Breen K.; Bankhead-Kendall B.; Alser O.; Mashbari H.; Velmahos G.; Maurer L.R.; El Moheb M.; Gaitanidis A.; Naar L.; Christensen M.A.; Kapoen C.; Langeveld K.; El Hechi M.; Mokhtari A.; Main B.; MacCabe T.; Newton C.; Blencowe N.S.; Fudulu D.P.; Bhojwani D.; Baquedano M.; Caputo M.; Rapetto F.; Flannery O.; Hassan A.; Edwards J.; Ward A.; Tadross D.; Majkowski L.; Blundell C.; Forlani S.; Nair R.; Guha S.; Brown S.R.; Steele C.; Kelty C.J.; Newman T.; Lee M.; Chetty G.; Lye G.; Balasubramanian S.P.; Sureshkumar Shah N.; Sherif M.; Al-Mukhtar A.; Whitehall E.; Giblin A.; Wells F.; Sharkey A.; Adamec A.; Madan S.; Konsten J.; Van Heinsbergen M.; *Sou A.; *Simpson D.; *Hamilton E.; *Blair J.; Jimeno Fraile J.; Morales-Garcia D.; Carrillo-Rivas M.; Toledo Martinez E.; Pascual A.; Landaluce-Olavarria A.; Gonzalez De Miguel M.; Fernandez Gomez Cruzado L.; Begona E.; Lecumberri D.; Calvo Rey A.; Prada Hervella G.M.; Dos Santos Carregal L.; Rodriguez Fernandez M.I.; Freijeiro M.; El Drubi Vega S.; Van Den Eynde J.; Oosterlinck W.; Van Den Eynde R.; Sermon A.; Boeckxstaens A.; Cordonnier A.; De Coster J.; Jaekers J.; Politis C.; Miserez M.; Galipienso Eri M.; Garcia Montesino J.D.; Dellonder Frigole J.; Noriego Munoz D.; Lizzi V.; Vovola F.; Arminio A.; Cotoia A.; Sarni A.L.; Bekheit M.; Kamera B.S.; Elhusseini M.; Sharma P.; Ahmeidat A.; Gradinariu G.; Cymes W.; Hannah A.; Mignot G.; Shaikh S.; Agilinko J.; Sgro A.; Rashid M.M.; Milne K.; McIntyre J.; Akhtar M.A.; Turnbull A.; Brunt A.; Stewart K.E.; Wilson M.S.J.; Rutherford D.; McGivern K.; Massie E.; Duff S.; Moura F.; Brown B.C.; Asaad P.; Wadham B.; Aneke I.A.; Collis J.; Warburton H.; Fountain D.M.; Laurente R.; Sigamoney K.V.; Dasa M.; George K.; Naqui Z.; Galhoum M.; Lipede C.; Gabr A.; Radhakrishnan A.; Hasan M.T.; Kalenderov R.; Pathmanaban O.; Colombo F.; Chelva R.; Subba K.; Abou-Foul A.K.; Khalefa M.; Hossain F.; Moores T.; Pickering L.; Shah J.; Anthoney J.; Emmerson O.; Bevan K.; Makin-Taylor R.; Ong C.S.; Callan R.; Bloom O.; Vidya R.; Chauhan G.; Kaur J.; Burahee A.; Bleibleh S.; Pigadas N.; Snee D.; Bhasin S.; Crichton A.; Habeebullah A.; Bodla A.S.; Yassin N.; Mondragon M.; Dewan V.; Giuffrida M.C.; Marano A.; Palagi S.; Di Maria Grimaldi S.; Testa V.; Peluso C.; Borghi F.; Simonato A.; Puppo A.; D'Agruma M.; Chiarpenello R.; Pellegrino L.; Maione F.; Cianflocca D.; Pruiti Ciarello V.; Giraudo G.; Gelarda E.; Dalmasso E.; Abrate A.; Daniele A.; Ciriello V.; Rosato F.; Garnero A.; Leotta L.; Chiozza M.; Anania G.; Urbani A.; Koleva Radica M.; Carcoforo P.; Portinari M.; Sibilla M.; Archer J.E.; Odeh A.; Siddaiah N.; Baumber R.; Parry J.; Carmichael H.; Velopulos C.G.; Wright F.L.; Urban S.; McIntyre R.C.; Schroeppel T.J.; Hennessy E.A.; Dunn J.; Zier L.; Parmar C.; McCluney S.; Shah S.; Munoz Vives J.M.; Osorio A.; Gomez Diaz C.J.; Guariglia C.A.; Soto Montesinos C.; Sanchon L.; Xicola Martinez M.; Guardia N.; Collera P.; Diaz Del Gobbo R.; Sanchez Jimenez R.; Farre Font R.; Flores Clotet R.; Brathwaite C.E.M.; Liu H.; Petrone P.; Hakmi H.; Sohail A.H.; Baltazar G.; Heckburn R.; Madhvani K.; Hampton M.; Hormis A.P.; Young R.; Miu V.; Sheridan K.; MacDonald L.; Green S.; Onos L.; Dean B.; Luney C.; Myatt R.; Williams M.A.; McVeigh J.; Alqallaf A.; Ben-Sassi A.; Mellor K.; Joshi P.; Joshi Y.; Crichton R.; Sonksen J.; Aldridge K.; Layton G.R.; Karki B.; Jeong H.; Pankhania S.; Asher S.; Folorunso A.; Mistry S.; Singh B.; Winyard J.; Mangwani J.; Babu B.H.B.; Liyanage A.S.D.; Newman S.; Blake I.; Weerasinghe C.; Ballabio M.; Bisagni P.; Longhi M.; Armao T.; Madonini M.; Gagliano A.; Pizzini P.; Alga A.; Nordberg M.; Sandblom G.; Jallad S.; Lord J.; Anderson C.; El Kafsi J.; Logishetty K.; Saadya A.; Midha R.; Ip M.; Subbiah Ponniah H.; Stockdale T.; Bacarese-Hamilton T.; Foster L.; James A.; Anjarwalla N.; Marujo Henriques D.; Hettige R.; Baban C.; Tenovici A.; Salerno G.; Hardie J.; Page S.; Anazor F.; King S.D.; Luck J.; Kazzaz S.; Patel M.; Shabana A.; Alanbuki A.; Usman O.; Hkruijff S.; De Vries J.P.P.M.; Steinkamp P.J.; Jonker P.K.C.; Van Der Plas W.Y.; Bierman W.; Janssen Y.; Borgstein A.B.J.; Gisbertz S.S.; Van Berge Henegouwen M.I.; Enjuto D.; Perez Gonzalez M.; Diaz Pena P.; Gonzalez J.; Marqueta De Salas M.; Martinez Pascual P.; Rodriguez Gomez L.; Garces Garcia R.; Ramos Bonilla A.; Herrera-Merino N.; Fernandez Bernabe P.; Cagigal Ortega E.P.; Hernandez I.; Garcia De Castro Rubio E.; Cervera I.; Kashora F.; Siddique M.H.; Singh A.; Barmpagianni C.; Basgaran A.; Basha A.; Okechukwu V.; Bartsch A.; Gallagher P.; Maqsood A.; Sahnan K.; Leo C.A.; Lewis S.E.; Ubhi H.K.; Exley R.; Khan U.; Shah P.; Saxena S.; Zafar N.; Abdul-Jabar H.; Mongelli F.; Bernasconi M.; Di Giuseppe M.; Christoforidis D.; La Regina D.; Arigoni M.; Liew I.; Al-Sukaini A.; Mediratta S.; Saxena D.; Boal M.; Dean H.; Higgs S.; Stanger S.; Abdalaziz H.; Constable J.; Ishii H.; Preece R.; Dovell G.; Gopi Reddy R.; Dehal A.; Shah H.B.; Cross G.W.V.; Seyed-Safi P.; Smart Y.W.; Kuc A.; Al-Yaseen M.; Jayasankar B.; Balasubramaniam D.; Abdelsaid K.; Mundkur N.; Gallagher B.; Hine T.; Keeler B.; Soulsby R.E.; Taylor A.; Davies E.; Ryska O.; Raymond T.; Rogers S.; Tong A.; Hawkin P.; Kinnaman G.; Meagher A.; Sharma I.; Holler E.; Dunning J.; Viswanath Y.; Freystaetter K.; Dixon J.; Hadfield J.N.; Hilley A.; Egglestone A.; Smith B.; Arkani S.; Freedman J.; Youssef M.; Sreedharan L.; Baskaran D.; Shaikh I.; Seebah K.; Reid J.; Watts D.; Kouritas V.; Chrastek D.; Maryan G.; Gill D.F.; Khatun F.; Ranjit S.; Parakh J.; Sarodaya V.; Daadipour A.; Khalifa M.; Bosch K.D.; Bashkirova V.; Dvorkin L.S.; Kalidindi V.K.; Choudhry A.; Marx W.; Espino Segura-Illa M.; Sanchez Aniceto G.; Castano-Leon A.M.; Jimenez-Roldan L.; Delgado Fernandez J.; Perez Nunez A.; Lagares A.; Garcia Perez D.; Santas M.; Paredes I.; Esteban Sinovas O.; Moreno-Gomez L.; Rubio E.; Vega V.; Vivas Lopez A.; Labalde Martinez M.; Garcia Villar O.; Pelaez Torres P.M.; Garcia-Borda J.; Ferrero Herrero E.; Gomez P.; Eiriz Fernandez C.; Ojeda-Thies C.; Pardo Garcia J.M.; Wynn Jones H.; Divecha H.; Whelton C.; 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Modi N.; Sofat R.; Noel J.; Nunn R.; Adegbola S.; Eriberto F.; Sharma V.; Tanna R.; Lodhia S.; Carvalho L.; Osorio C.; Antunes J.; Lourenco S.; Balau P.; Godinho M.; Pereira A.; Keller D.S.; Smart N.J.

Citation:BMJ Open. 11(11) (no pagination), 2021. Article Number: e050830.

Abstract:Objectives: Studies have demonstrated high rates of mortality in people with proximal femoral fracture and SARS-CoV-2, but there is limited published data on the factors that influence mortality for clinicians to make informed treatment decisions. This study aims to report the 30-day mortality associated with perioperative infection of patients undergoing surgery for proximal femoral fractures and to examine the factors that influence mortality in a multivariate analysis. Setting: Prospective, international, multicentre, observational cohort study. Participants Patients undergoing any operation for a proximal femoral fracture from 1 February to 30 April 2020 and with perioperative SARS-CoV-2 infection (either 7 days prior or 30-day postoperative). Primary outcome 30-day mortality. Multivariate modelling was performed to identify factors associated with 30-day mortality. Results This study reports included 1063 patients from 174 hospitals in 19 countries. Overall 30-day mortality was 29.4% (313/1063). In an adjusted model, 30-day mortality was associated with male gender (OR 2.29, 95% CI 1.68 to 3.13, p<0.001), age >80 years (OR 1.60, 95% CI 1.1 to 2.31, p=0.013), preoperative diagnosis of dementia (OR 1.57, 95% CI 1.15 to 2.16, p=0.005), kidney disease (OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.18 to 2.55, p=0.005) and congestive heart failure (OR 1.62, 95% CI 1.06 to 2.48, p=0.025). Mortality at 30 days was lower in patients with a preoperative diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 (OR 0.6, 95% CI 0.6 (0.42 to 0.85), p=0.004). There was no difference in mortality in patients with an increase to delay in surgery (p=0.220) or type of anaesthetic given (p=0.787). Conclusions: Patients undergoing surgery for a proximal femoral fracture with a perioperative infection of SARS-CoV-2 have a high rate of mortality. This study would support the need for providing these patients with individualised medical and anaesthetic care, including medical optimisation before theatre. Careful preoperative counselling is needed for those with a proximal femoral fracture and SARS-CoV-2, especially those in the highest risk groups.

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