Short statured primigravidae: Options for the obstetric management from a survey of UK obstetricians (2021)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
*Rachaneni S.; Gurol-Urganci I.; Basu M.; Thakar R.; Sultan A.; Freeman R.

Citation:
European Journal of Obstetrics Gynecology and Reproductive Biology; Jan 2021; vol. 256 ; p. 379-384

Abstract:
Objective: To assess the current antenatal and intrapartum management options for primigravid women of short stature with a clinically large fetus by a survey of UK Obstetricians. Study design: An online survey comprised of 15 questions including the options on timing and mode of delivery, counselling about the risk of long-term pelvic floor morbidity following spontaneous vaginal and instrumental deliveries, choice of instruments and the role of episiotomy. The survey was sent to the participants as a part of Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) Newsletter between September 2017 to October 2018. The scenario described was of a primigravid short stature woman (i.e. height of 160 cm or less) who presents with a clinically large fetus at 38 weeks gestation. Result(s): 424 Obstetricians participated in the survey. The participation ratio cannot be identified as the survey was emailed as a part of the RCOG Newsletter. Sixty five percent respondents stated that they would scan for estimated fetal weight, 48 % would offer induction of labour at 40 weeks and 14 % would offer an elective/planned caesarean section (CS) at 39-40 weeks. Fifty nine percent would discuss all these risks: obstructed labour, shoulder dystocia, instrumental delivery and obstetric anal sphincter injury (OASI). 73 % would not discuss the long-term risks of urinary and/or faecal incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse. In the presence of failure to progress in the second stage of labour, 69 % would attempt a rotational instrumental delivery and 5% would offer a caesarean section. Manual rotation and ‘straight’ forceps application were the most frequent type of rotational delivery, followed by Ventouse and Kiellands forceps. Thirty four percent stated that they do not routinely perform an episiotomy in this scenario. Seventy three percent stated that their choice of instrument was not based on the long-term risk of urinary and faecal incontinence. Conclusion(s): The results suggest that 40 % of the respondents would not discuss all of the complications after vaginal delivery in women of short stature. The most common delivery option would be vaginal delivery.

Oral and maxillofacial surgery patient satisfaction with telephone consultations during the COVID-19 pandemic (2020)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
*Horgan T.J.; *Alsabbagh A.Y.; *McGoldrick D.M.; *Bhatia S.K.; *Messahel A.

Citation:
British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery; 2020 [epub ahead of print]

Abstract:
Due to the COVID-19 pandemic most oral and maxillofacial surgical (OMFS) units have moved to conducting patient consultations over the telephone. The aim of this study was to assess patients’ satisfaction with telephone consultations during the COVID-19 pandemic. A retrospective survey was conducted of OMFS patients at our hospital who had telephone consultations between 1 April – 8 June 2020. The survey was conducted by independent interviewers and used the Generic Medical Interview Satisfaction Scale (G-MISS) along with a previously published additional questionnaire. Variables recorded included age, gender, theme of consultation, grade of clinician, and type of consultation. Statistical analysis was performed to assess for any differences between patient groups. The records of 150 consecutive patients were reviewed and 135 met inclusion criteria. A total of 109 patients completed the survey giving a response rate of 80.74%. The total G-MISS score for satisfaction was high, which indicates a high level of satisfaction among all patients. We found no statistical difference in satisfaction when comparing patients in terms of gender, age, theme of consultation, or level of clinician. A significant difference was found in compliance levels between review and new patients, with review patients demonstrating higher compliance levels (p=0.004). Overall, 83.48% of patients said they would be willing to have a telephone consultation in future. The majority of patients in this study reported high levels of satisfaction with telephone consultations. New patients reported lower levels of compliance which may suggest this type of consultation is less suited to telephone consultation.

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Benign thyroid swelling presenting as Horner’s syndrome (2020)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
*Shaji S.K.; *Chan J.; *Hari C

Citation:
BMJ Case Reports; Dec 2020; vol. 13 (no. 12).

Abstract:
Horner’s syndrome is a rare neurological condition seen in association with the disruption in the sympathetic nerve supply. Thyroid swelling is a common condition but rarely causes cervical sympathetic chain compression. We describe a case of a 54-year-old man who presented with Horner’s syndrome secondary to a benign thyroid nodule with pressure effect on the sympathetic chain. An association between thyroid pathologies and Horner’s syndrome has been mentioned previously, however, to our knowledge, this is the first case of Horner’s syndrome being the initial presentation for an underlying benign thyroid swelling.

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Coronavirus Disease 2019: the Pivotal Role of UK Clinical Oncology and the UK Coronavirus Cancer Monitoring Project (2021)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
*Best ; Starkey, T.; *Chatterjee, A.; Fackrell, D.; *Pettit, L.; *Srihari, N.; Tween, H.; Olsson-Brown, A.; Cheng, V.; Hughes, D.J.; Lee, A.J.X.; Purshouse, K.; Arnold, R.; UK Coronavirus Cancer Monitoring Project Team; Sivakumar, S.; Cazier, J.-B.; Lee, L.Y.W.

Citation:
Clinical Oncology; Jan 2021; vol. 33 (no. 1)

Abstract:

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GLP-1 receptor agonists in type 2 diabetes: An underused asset? (2020)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
*Morris, David

Citation:
Journal of Diabetes Nursing; Aug 2020; vol. 24 (no. 5); p. 1-11

Abstract:
As our understanding of the incretin hormone system has increased, a number of drugs targeting this system
have been developed. The realisation of this potential has developed rapidly, and glucagon-like peptide-1
receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) are now a standard feature in management guidelines for type 2 diabetes. This
article reviews the operation of the incretin system and the mechanism by which GLP-1 RAs act to provide
benefit in type 2 diabetes. The availability and indications for use of the GLP-1 RAs, and their clinical benefits
and disadvantages, are summarised. The position of GLP-1 RAs in the management of type 2 diabetes is
discussed pragmatically, with reference to various key guidelines.

Managing diabetes during the COVID-19 pandemic (2020)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
*Morris, David

Citation:
Practice Nursing; Nov 2020; vol. 31 (no. 11); p. 450-455

Abstract:
People with diabetes are known to be more severely affected by COVID-19 than the general population. David
Morris provides an overview of how to manage the illness in this group The outbreak of a new viral infection in
Wuhan, a city in Habei Province, China, became evident in December 2019. For most individuals who contract
COVID-19 the disease is mild to moderate. Older people are disproportionately affected with serious disease,
while children appear less likely to experience serious illness. A number of conditions are linked to increased
severity of disease and poorer outcomes including both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. This article looks at why
those with diabetes are at higher risk, and how to manage diabetes during the pandemic.

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