Effective implementation of an advanced clinical practitioner role in breast imaging (2021)

Type of publication:
Conference abstract

Author(s):
*Deane L.; *Williams S.; *Cielecki L.; *Burley S.

Citation:
Breast Cancer Research 2021, 23(Suppl 1):P57

Abstract:
Background: Due to the immense pressure to provide capacity for women with breast symptoms, to be seen  within two weeks, a new innovative role has been created to provide increased capacity. Introduction: The breast services see many women with conditions that are benign and easily identified upon ultrasound. The majority of these conditions occur in women under the age of 40years. The role of an advanced clinical practitioner was created to answer a service need. This role requires a highly specialised cohort of skills combining breast image interpretation, breast ultrasound and breast biopsying alongside a range of clinical competences enabling autonomous practice within clear governance.
Method(s): A new clinic was created for under 40 aged women only requiring only a breast clinical specialist and an advanced clinical practitioner, using ultrasound for assessment. Unexpected findings suspicious upon ultrasound-would be redirected to the next consultant led clinic for full imaging assessment and biopsy.
Result(s): Increased capacity was achieved, without increased costs. Anxiety levels were reduced due to these patients seen within these clinics and more specialist skills could be directed to more complex cases in the traditional cancer clinics.
Conclusion(s): The use of this specialist role has proven to be innovative and specialised in answering capacity issues within the workforce. The ACP role is utilised as a support to all clinics working alongside consultant radiographers as well as in an autonomous role, thereby freeing up the consultants for cases requiring specialist skills. The stability of the breast service has been ensured

Link to full-text [open access – no password required]

Male breast ultrasound: 2019 audit results (2021)

Type of publication:
Conference abstract

Author(s):
*Ozcan U.A.; *Williams S.; *Metelko M

Citation:
Breast Cancer Research 2021, 23(Suppl 1):O3.3

Abstract:
Background and Purpose: Male breast cancer is rare whereas gynaecomastia is very common. Only asymmetrical gynaecomastia require breast imaging and focal lumps are amenable to clinical core biopsy. So the use of ultrasound in the assessment of male breast should be limited. The aim of this study is to audit the referral indications and ultrasound outcomes in male breast US (MBUS) patients against local guidelines.
Method(s): In the last 5 years, 968 patients were referred for MBUS in our Trust. This audit includes the patients between 02/01/2019-04/12/2019. The duplicate patients and follow-ups were excluded from the study. In total, 197 patients were analysed (mean age: 58 (8-90) retrospectively. Referral diagnosis, age, US grading and clinical outcomes were noted.
Result(s): Of the 197 patients, 79% were gynecomastia (133), lipoma (21) or fat necrosis (2), and 15% (30) were normal. There was 1 chest wall lymphoma and 1 DCIS, and 9 (5%) patients had benign breast disease (fibroepithelial lesions, abscess, papilloma, sebaceous cysts, haematoma). In 122 patients (62%) clinical grade was not given, 66 had P2, 8 had P3, 1 had P5. 2 patients were scored as U4 and 4 patients as U3.
Conclusion(s): These results clearly show that 99% of the patients referred to MBUS were benign. And also 95% of the patients were clinically benign or not assessed. The excessive use of MBUS without a clinical indication leads to patient anxiety, increased waiting times and might delay the proper imaging to the patients who should have the priority in terms of clinical indication. Careful clinical assessment before ultrasound referral is mandatory for better care.

Link to full-text [open access – no password required]

Does arbitration work? (2021)

Type of publication:
Conference abstract

Author(s):
*Williams S.; *Deane L.; *Burley S.; *Cielecki L.; *Aksoy U.; *Metelko M.

Citation:
Breast Cancer Research 2021, 23(Suppl 1):P63

Abstract:
Introduction: To improve cancer detection rates, personal performance and as part of our routine service improvement programme, an audit was undertaken of discordant cases returned directly to routine recall between 1/4/15 and 31/3/17 inclusive. These were reviewed against the results of the subsequent screening round to determine if the correct judgement had been made at the previous screening round or if there were any opportunities to learn from misinterpretation.
Method(s): All cases arbitrated and directly returned to routine screening between 2015/16 and 2016/17 were identified and crossreferenced with the results for the subsequent screening episode. All screen detected cancers previously arbitrated on the same side were reviewed by the same routine method and criteria as all interval cancers within our unit and each was given an ‘interval’ category. All of the screen detected cancers previously arbitrated on the same side were included in the annual interval cancer review session to discuss learn opportunities and improved outcomes.
Result(s): There were 829 cases arbitrated and returned to routine screening at the original screening episode 2015/16 or 2016/17. 11 cases were diagnosed with a same side screen detected cancer at the subsequent screening round and 2 cases presented as a same side interval cancer. Neither interval cancers detected at the case review. 1 of the 11 same side screen detected cancers classified as minimal signs.
Conclusion(s): In our unit arbitration cases returned to routine recall is the correct decision in the vast majority.

Link to full-text [open access – no password required]

British Society for Echocardiography and British Cardio-Oncology Society guideline for transthoracic echocardiographic assessment of adult cancer patients receiving anthracyclines and/or trastuzumab (2021)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
Dobson R.; Ghosh A.K.; Stanway S.; Manisty C.; Ky B.; Marwick T.; Stout M.; Pearce K.; Harkness A.; Steeds R.; Robinson S.; Oxborough D.; Adlam D.; Rana B.; *Ingram T.; Ring L.; Rosen S.; Plummer C.; Harbinson M.; Sharma V.; Lyon A.R.; Augustine D.X.

Citation:
Echo Research and Practice; Mar 2021; vol. 8 (no. 1)

Abstract:
The subspecialty of cardio-oncology aims to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with cancer or following cancer treatment. Cancer therapy can lead to a variety of cardiovascular complications, including left ventricular systolic dysfunction, pericardial disease, and valvular heart disease. Echocardiography is a key diagnostic imaging tool in the diagnosis and surveillance for many of these complications. The baseline assessment and subsequent surveillance of patients undergoing treatment with anthracyclines and/or human epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (HER) 2-positive targeted treatment (e.g. trastuzumab and pertuzumab) form a significant proportion of cardio-oncology patients undergoing echocardiography. This guideline from the British Society of Echocardiography and British Cardio-Oncology Society outlines a protocol for baseline and surveillance echocardiography of patients undergoing treatment with anthracyclines and/or trastuzumab. The methodology for acquisition of images and the advantages and disadvantages of techniques are discussed. Echocardiographic definitions for considering cancer therapeutics-related cardiac dysfunction are also presented.

Link to full-text [open access – no password required]

Cost-effectiveness of mifepristone and misoprostol versus misoprostol alone for the management of missed miscarriage: an economic evaluation based on the MifeMiso Trial (2021)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
Okeke Ogwulu, C B; Williams, E V; Chu, J J; Devall, A J; Beeson, L E; Hardy, P; Cheed, V; Yongzhong, S; Jones, L L; La Fontaine Papadopoulos, J H; Bender-Atik, R; Brewin, J; Hinshaw, K; Choudhary, M; Ahmed, A; Naftalin, J; Nunes, N; Oliver, A; Izzat, F; Bhatia, K; Hassan, I; Jeve, Y; Hamilton, J; Deb, S; Bottomley, C; Ross, J; Watkins, L; *Underwood, M; Cheong, Y; Kumar, C S; Gupta, P; Small, R; Pringle, S; Hodge, F S; Shahid, A; Horne, A W; Quenby, S; Gallos, I D; Coomarasamy, A; Roberts, T E

Citation:
BJOG : an international journal of obstetrics and gynaecology; May 2021 [epub ahead of print]

Abstract:
OBJECTIVE To assess the cost-effectiveness of mifepristone and misoprostol (MifeMiso) compared with misoprostol only for the medical management of a missed miscarriage. DESIGN Within-trial economic evaluation and model-based analysis to set the findings in the context of the wider economic evidence for a range of comparators. Incremental costs and outcomes were calculated using non-parametric bootstrapping and reported using cost-effectiveness acceptability curves. Analyses were performed from the NHS perspective.SETTING28 UK NHS early pregnancy units.PARTICIPANTS711 women aged 16-39 years with ultrasound evidence of a missed miscarriage. INTERVENTIONS Mifepristone and misoprostol or matched placebo and misoprostol tablets. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Cost per additional successfully managed miscarriage and QALYs. RESULTS For the within-trial analysis, MifeMiso intervention resulted in an absolute effect difference of 6.6% (95% CI: 0.7% to 12.5%) per successfully managed miscarriage and QALYs difference of 0.04% (95% CI: -0.01% to 0.1%). The average cost per successfully managed miscarriage was lower in the MifeMiso arm than in the placebo and misoprostol arm, with a cost-saving of £182 (95% CI: £26 to £338). Hence, MifeMiso intervention dominated the use of misoprostol alone. The model-based analysis showed that MifeMiso intervention is dominant compared to expectant management and the current medical management strategy. However, the model-based evidence suggests that the intervention is a less effective but less costly strategy than surgical management. CONCLUSIONS The within-trial analysis found that based on cost-effectiveness grounds, MifeMiso intervention is likely to be recommended by decision-makers for the medical management of women presenting with a missed miscarriage.

Link to full-text [open access – no password required]

Altmetrics:

Postpartum haemorrhage and risk of long-term hypertension and cardiovascular disease: an English population-based longitudinal study using linked primary and secondary care databases (2021)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
*Parry-Smith, William; Šumilo, Dana; Subramanian, Anuradhaa; Gokhale, Krishna; Okoth, Kelvin; Gallos, Ioannis; Coomarasamy, Arri; Nirantharakumar, Krishnarajah

Citation:
BMJ Open; May 2021; vol. 11 (no. 5); p. e041566

Abstract:
OBJECTIVE To investigate the long-term risk of developing hypertension and cardiovascular disease (CVD) among those women who suffered a postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) compared with those women who did not. DESIGN Population-based longitudinal open cohort study. SETTING English primary care (The Health Improvement Network (THIN)) and secondary care (Hospital Episode Statistics (HES)) databases. POPULATION Women exposed to PPH during the study period matched for age and date of delivery, and unexposed. METHODS We conducted an open cohort study using linked primary care THIN and HES Databases, from 1 January 1997 to 31 January 2018. A total of 42 327 women were included: 14 109 of them exposed to PPH during the study period and 28 218 matched for age and date of delivery, and unexposed to PPH. HRs for cardiovascular outcomes among women who had and did not have PPH were estimated after controlling for covariates using multivariate Cox regression models. OUTCOME MEASURES Risk of hypertensive disease, ischaemic heart disease, heart failure, stroke or transient ischaemic attack. RESULTS During a median follow-up of over 4 years, there was no significant difference in the risk of hypertensive disease after adjustment for covariates (adjusted HR (aHR): 1.03 (95% CI: 0.87 to 1.22); p=0.71). We also did not observe a statistically significant difference in the risk of composite CVD (ischaemic heart disease, heart failure, stroke or transient ischaemic attack) between the exposed and the unexposed cohort (aHR: 0.86 (95% CI: 0.52 to 1.43; p=0.57). CONCLUSION Over a median follow-up of 4 years, we did not observe an association between PPH and hypertension or CVD.

Link to full-text [open access – no password required]

MRI of the Achilles tendon – a comprehensive pictorial review. Part two (2021)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
Szaro P.; Nilsson-Helander K.; *Carmont M.

Citation:
European Journal of Radiology Open; Jan 2021; vol. 8

Abstract:
The most common disorder affecting the Achilles tendon is midportion tendinopathy. A focal fluid signal indicates microtears, which may progress to partial and complete rupture. Assessment of Achilles tendon healing should be based on tendon morphology and tension rather than structural signal. After nonoperative management or surgical repair of the Achilles tendon, areas of fluid signal is pathologic because it indicates re-rupture. A higher signal in the postoperative Achilles tendon is a common finding and is present for a prolonged period following surgical intervention and needs to be interpreted alongside the clinical appearance.

Link to full-text [open access – no password required]

BSE and BCOS Guideline for Transthoracic Echocardiographic Assessment of Adult Cancer Patients Receiving Anthracyclines and/or Trastuzumab (2021)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
Dobson R.; Ghosh A.K.; Manisty C.; Ky B.; Marwick T.; Stout M.; Pearce K.; Harkness A.; Steeds R.; Robinson S.; Oxborough D.; Adlam D.; Stanway S.; Rana B.; *Ingram T.; Ring L.; Rosen S.; Lyon A.R.; Plummer C.; Harbinson M.; Sharma V.; Augustine D.X.

Citation:
JACC: CardioOncology; Mar 2021; vol. 3 (no. 1); p. 1-16

Abstract:
The subspecialty of cardio-oncology aims to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with cancer or following cancer treatment. Cancer therapy can lead to a variety of cardiovascular complications, including left ventricular systolic dysfunction, pericardial disease, and valvular heart disease. Echocardiography is a key diagnostic imaging tool in the diagnosis and surveillance for many of these complications. The baseline assessment and subsequent surveillance of patients undergoing treatment with anthracyclines and/or human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) 2-positive targeted treatment (e.g., trastuzumab and pertuzumab) form a significant proportion of cardio-oncology patients undergoing echocardiography. This guideline from the British Society of Echocardiography and British Cardio-Oncology Society outlines a protocol for baseline and surveillance echocardiography of patients undergoing treatment with anthracyclines and/or trastuzumab. The methodology for acquisition of images and the advantages and disadvantages of techniques are discussed. Echocardiographic definitions for considering cancer therapeutics-related cardiac dysfunction are also presented.

Link to full-text [open access – no password required]

MRI of the Achilles tendon-A comprehensive pictorial review. Part one (2021)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
Szaro P.; Nilsson-Helander K.; *Carmont M.

Citation:
European Journal of Radiology Open; Jan 2021; vol. 8

Abstract:
The normal Achilles tendon is composed of twisted subtendons separated by thin high signal septae, which are a potential pitfall on MRI because they mimic a tendon tear. Tendinopathy and full thickness tears may be assessed effectively both on MRI and ultrasound. MRI is superior to ultrasound in detection of partial tears and for postoperative assessment. The use of fat suppression sequences allows the ability to detect focal lesions. Sagittal and coronal sections are useful for assessing the distance between stumps of a ruptured tendon. Sequences with contrast are indicated in postoperative investigations and suspicion of infection, arthritis or tumor. MRI may reveal inflammatory changes with minor symptoms long before the clinical manifestations of seronegative spondyloarthropathy. The most common non-traumatic focal lesion of the Achilles tendon is Achilles tendon xanthoma, which is manifested by intermediate or slightly higher signal on T1- and T2-weighted images compared to that in the normal Achilles tendon. Other tumors of the Achilles tendon are very rare, whereas the involvement of the tendon from tumor in adjacent structures is more frequent. The novel MRI sequences may help to detect disorders of the Achilles tendon more specifically before clinical manifestation. Regeneration or remodeling of the Achilles tendon can be non-invasively detected and monitored in diffusion tensor imaging. Assessment of healing is possible using T2-mapping while evaluating the tendon vascularization in intravoxel incoherent motion MRI.

Link to full-text [open access – no password required]

Altmetrics:

Regional experiences of endotracheal intubation during the COVID-19 pandemic in The United Kingdom (2020)

Type of publication:
Conference abstract

Author(s):
Shuker B.; Smith E.; *Checketts P.; Khan Q.

Citation:
Intensive Care Medicine Experimental; 2020; vol. 8

Abstract:
Introduction: In the United Kingdom (UK), consensus guidelines for airway management were published early in the COVID-19 pandemic making recommendations to support clinicians during this potentially challenging intervention (1). Adaptions to existing guidance for airway management in critically ill adults from the Difficult Airway Society (2) included: use of personal protective equipment (PPE), preferential use of the best skilled airway manager to maximise chance of first-pass success, avoidance of aerosol-generating procedures (such as noninvasive ventilation, high flow nasal oxygenation), and use of reliable well practiced techniques (including videolaryngoscopy where appropriate). Objective(s): Areas of the West Midlands were some of the worst affected by the COVID-19 pandemic in the UK (3). We aimed to gain insight into the experiences of clinicians involved with airway management during the COVID-19 pandemic in this region. Method(s): An online survey was distributed to multiple centres within the West Midlands region of the UK. Clinicians who had experience of endotracheal intubation in patients with confirmed, suspected, or unknown COVID-19 status were asked to reflect upon their experience of one patient intubation. Result(s): 127 clinicians from 16 hospitals including 3 large university hospitals responded to the online survey, most were consultant grade (56.7%). Clinicians self-reported an average approximate number of pandemic intubations of 7.35 (range 1-30). When asked to reflect on a single intubation, clinicians reflected on intubations in ICU (42.5%), emergency departments (20.5%), wards (8.7%), and theatre (28.3%). Appropriate PPE was available in 96.1%. The most senior clinician available intubated in 65.4%. Clinicians reported first pass success in 93.7% of responses. Most intubators reported use of videolaryngoscopy (74.8%), however 26% reported not using this equipment regularly and 5.5% did not feel confident with their equipment. Despite a high success rate, difficulties were reported in 15.1%. The most common was desaturation. Other common difficulties included equipment or environment unfamiliarity, lack of skilled support. When asked what advice they would give to colleagues, frequently occurring themes included: ensuring familiarity with equipment, use of a checklist, use of videolaryngoscopy, and availability of a second intubator. Desire for simulation and equipment familiarisation was highlighted in multiple responses, and in one example a clinician attributed their success to a simulation session performed in the week prior. Conclusion(s): Experiences from clinicians in this region highlight the specific challenges encountered involved in airway management of patients with COVID-19, in particular highlighting the importance of advance preparation for intubation when faced with unfamiliar circumstances. Simulation sessions, use of checklists and standard operating procedures for emergency intubation may contribute to maintaining preparedness for intubation in this challenging patient group.

Link to full-text [open access – no password required]