Adding Celecoxib With or Without Zoledronic Acid for Hormone-Naïve Prostate Cancer: Long-Term Survival Results From an Adaptive, Multiarm, Multistage, Platform, Randomized Controlled Trial (2017)

Type of publication:
Randomised controlled trial

Author(s):
Mason, Malcolm D; Clarke, Noel W; James, Nicholas D; Dearnaley, David P; Spears, Melissa R; Ritchie, Alastair W S; Attard, Gerhardt; Cross, William; Jones, Rob J; Parker, Christopher C; Russell, J Martin; Thalmann, George N; Schiavone, Francesca; Cassoly, Estelle; Matheson, David; Millman, Robin; Rentsch, Cyrill A; Barber, Jim; Gilson, Clare; Ibrahim, Azman; Logue, John; Lydon, Anna; Nikapota, Ashok D; O’Sullivan, Joe M; Porfiri, Emilio; Protheroe, Andrew; *Srihari, Narayanan Nair; Tsang, David; Wagstaff, John; Wallace, Jan; Walmsley, Catherine; Parmar, Mahesh K B; Sydes, Matthew R; STAMPEDE Investigators

Citation:
Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology; 35, no. 14 (May 2017) p. 1530-1541.

Abstract:
Purpose Systemic Therapy for Advanced or Metastatic Prostate Cancer: Evaluation of Drug Efficacy is a randomized controlled trial using a multiarm, multistage, platform design. It recruits men with high-risk, locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer who were initiating long-term hormone therapy. We report survival data for two celecoxib (Cel)-containing comparisons, which stopped accrual early at interim analysis on the basis of failure-free survival. Patients and Methods Standard of care (SOC) was hormone therapy continuously (metastatic) or for ≥ 2 years (nonmetastatic); prostate (± pelvic node) radiotherapy was encouraged for men without metastases. Cel 400 mg was administered twice a day for 1 year. Zoledronic acid (ZA) 4 mg was administered for six 3-weekly cycles, then 4-weekly for 2 years. Stratified random assignment allocated patients 2:1:1 to SOC (control), SOC + Cel, or SOC + ZA + Cel. The primary outcome measure was all-cause mortality. Results were analyzed with Cox proportional hazards and flexible parametric models adjusted for stratification factors. Results A total of 1,245 men were randomly assigned (Oct 2005 to April 2011). Groups were balanced: median age, 65 years; 61% metastatic, 14% N+/X M0, 25% N0M0; 94% newly diagnosed; median prostate-specific antigen, 66 ng/mL. Median follow-up was 69 months. Grade 3 to 5 adverse events were seen in 36% SOC-only, 33% SOC + Cel, and 32% SOC + ZA + Cel patients. There were 303 control arm deaths (83% prostate cancer), and median survival was 66 months. Compared with SOC, the adjusted hazard ratio was 0.98 (95% CI, 0.80 to 1.20; P = .847; median survival, 70 months) for SOC + Cel and 0.86 (95% CI, 0.70 to 1.05; P =.130; median survival, 76 months) for SOC + ZA + Cel. Preplanned subgroup analyses in men with metastatic disease showed a hazard ratio of 0.78 (95% CI, 0.62 to 0.98; P = .033) for SOC + ZA + Cel. Conclusion These data show no overall evidence of improved survival with Cel. Preplanned subgroup analyses provide hypotheses for future studies.

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Addition of docetaxel, zoledronic acid, or both to first-line long-term hormone therapy in prostate cancer (STAMPEDE): Survival results from an adaptive, multiarm, multistage, platform randomised controlled trial (2016)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
James N.D., Sydes M.R., Clarke N.W., Mason M.D., Dearnaley D.P., Spears M.R., Ritchie A.W.S., Parker C.C., Russell J.M., Attard G., De Bono J., Cross W., Jones R.J., Thalmann G., Amos C., Matheson D., Millman R., Alzouebi M., Beesley S., Birtle A.J., Brock S., Cathomas R., Chakraborti P., Chowdhury S., Cook A., Elliott T., Gale J., Gibbs S., Graham J.D., Hetherington J., Hughes R., Laing R., McKinna F., McLaren D.B., O’Sullivan J.M., Parikh O., Peedell C., Protheroe A., Robinson A.J., *Srihari N., Srinivasan R., Staffurth J., Sundar S., Tolan S., Tsang D., Wagstaff J., Parmar M.K.B.

Citation:
The Lancet, March 2016, vol./is. 387/10024(1163-1177)

Abstract:
Background
Long-term hormone therapy has been the standard of care for advanced prostate cancer since the 1940s. STAMPEDE is a randomised controlled trial using a multiarm, multistage platform design. It recruits men with high-risk, locally advanced, metastatic or recurrent prostate cancer who are starting first-line long-term hormone therapy. We report primary survival results for three research comparisons testing the addition of zoledronic acid, docetaxel, or their combination to standard of care versus standard of care alone.
Methods
Standard of care was hormone therapy for at least 2 years; radiotherapy was encouraged for men with N0M0 disease to November, 2011, then mandated; radiotherapy was optional for men with node-positive non-metastatic (N+M0) disease. Stratified randomisation (via minimisation) allocated men 2:1:1:1 to standard of care only (SOC-only; control), standard of care plus zoledronic acid (SOC + ZA), standard of care plus docetaxel (SOC + Doc), or standard of care with both zoledronic acid and docetaxel (SOC + ZA + Doc). Zoledronic acid (4 mg) was given for six 3-weekly cycles, then 4-weekly until 2 years, and docetaxel (75 mg/m<sup>2</sup>) for six 3-weekly cycles with prednisolone 10 mg daily. There was no blinding to treatment allocation. The primary outcome measure was overall survival. Pairwise comparisons of research versus control had 90% power at 2.5% one-sided alpha for hazard ratio (HR) 0.75, requiring roughly 400 control arm deaths. Statistical analyses were undertaken with standard log-rank-type methods for time-to-event data, with hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs derived from adjusted Cox models. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00268476) and ControlledTrials.com (ISRCTN78818544).
Findings
2962 men were randomly assigned to four groups between Oct 5, 2005, and March 31, 2013. Median age was 65 years (IQR 60-71). 1817 (61%) men had M+ disease, 448 (15%) had N+/X M0, and 697 (24%) had N0M0. 165 (6%) men were previously treated with local therapy, and median prostate-specific antigen was 65 ng/mL (IQR 23-184). Median follow-up was 43 months (IQR 30-60). There were 415 deaths in the control group (347 [84%] prostate cancer). Median overall survival was 71 months (IQR 32 to not reached) for SOC-only, not reached (32 to not reached) for SOC + ZA (HR 0.94, 95% CI 0.79-1.11; p=0.450), 81 months (41 to not reached) for SOC + Doc (0.78, 0.66-0.93; p=0.006), and 76 months (39 to not reached) for SOC + ZA + Doc (0.82, 0.69-0.97; p=0.022). There was no evidence of heterogeneity in treatment effect (for any of the treatments) across prespecified subsets. Grade 3-5 adverse events were reported for 399 (32%) patients receiving SOC, 197 (32%) receiving SOC + ZA, 288 (52%) receiving SOC + Doc, and 269 (52%) receiving SOC + ZA + Doc.
Interpretation
Zoledronic acid showed no evidence of survival improvement and should not be part of standard of care for this population. Docetaxel chemotherapy, given at the time of long-term hormone therapy initiation, showed evidence of improved survival accompanied by an increase in adverse events. Docetaxel treatment should become part of standard of care for adequately fit men commencing long-term hormone therapy.
Funding
Cancer Research UK, Medical Research Council, Novartis, Sanofi-Aventis, Pfizer, Janssen, Astellas, NIHR Clinical Research Network, Swiss Group for Clinical Cancer Research.

Link to more details or full-text: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0140673615010375

Failure-Free Survival and Radiotherapy in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer: Data From Patients in the Control Arm of the STAMPEDE Trial (2016)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
James, Nicholas D, Spears, Melissa R, Clarke, Noel W, Dearnaley, David P, Mason, Malcolm D, Parker, Christopher C, Ritchie, Alastair W S, Russell, J Martin, Schiavone, Francesca, Attard, Gerhardt, de Bono, Johann S, Birtle, Alison, Engeler, Daniel S, Elliott, Tony, Matheson, David, O’Sullivan, Joe, Pudney, Delia, *Srihari, Narayanan, Wallace, Jan, Barber, Jim, Syndikus, Isabel, Parmar, Mahesh K B, Sydes, Matthew R, STAMPEDE Investigators

Citation:
JAMA oncology, Mar 2016, vol. 2, no. 3, p. 348-357

Abstract:
The natural history of patients with newly diagnosed high-risk nonmetastatic (M0) prostate cancer receiving hormone therapy (HT) either alone or with standard-of-care radiotherapy (RT) is not well documented. Furthermore, no clinical trial has assessed the role of RT in patients with node-positive (N+) M0 disease. The STAMPEDE Trial includes such individuals, allowing an exploratory multivariate analysis of the impact of radical RT. To describe survival and the impact on failure-free survival of RT by nodal involvement in these patients. Cohort study using data collected for patients allocated to the control arm (standard-of-care only) of the STAMPEDE Trial between October 5, 2005, and May 1, 2014. Outcomes are presented as hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% CIs derived from adjusted Cox models; survival estimates are reported at 2 and 5 years. Participants were high-risk, hormone-naive patients with newly diagnosed M0 prostate cancer starting long-term HT for the first time. Radiotherapy is encouraged in this group, but mandated for patients with node-negative (N0) M0 disease only since November 2011. Long-term HT either alone or with RT, as per local standard. Planned RT use was recorded at entry. Failure-free survival (FFS) and overall survival. A total of 721 men with newly diagnosed M0 disease were included: median age at entry, 66 (interquartile range [IQR], 61-72) years, median (IQR) prostate-specific antigen level of 43 (18-88) ng/mL. There were 40 deaths (31 owing to prostate cancer) with 17 months’ median follow-up. Two-year survival was 96% (95% CI, 93%-97%) and 2-year FFS, 77% (95% CI, 73%-81%). Median (IQR) FFS was 63 (26 to not reached) months. Time to FFS was worse in patients with N+ disease (HR, 2.02 [95% CI, 1.46-2.81]) than in those with N0 disease. Failure-free survival outcomes favored planned use of RT for patients with both N0M0 (HR, 0.33 [95% CI, 0.18-0.61]) and N+M0 disease (HR, 0.48 [95% CI, 0.29-0.79]). Survival for men entering the cohort with high-risk M0 disease was higher than anticipated at study inception. These nonrandomized data were consistent with previous trials that support routine use of RT with HT in patients with N0M0 disease. Additionally, the data suggest that the benefits of RT extend to men with N+M0 disease. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00268476; ISRCTN78818544.