The histopathological correlation of magnetic resonance imaging-identified additional lesions detected in 2nd read breast MRIS (2020)

Type of publication:
Conference abstract

Author(s):
*Aksoy U.; *Barlow E.; *Williams S.; *Lake B.; *Metelko M

Citation:
European Journal of Surgical Oncology; Jun 2020; vol. 46 (no. 6), p. e19

Abstract:
Introduction: Magnetic resonance imaging-identified additional lesions (MRALs) in breast cancer have always been a diagnostic dilemma as they may result in significant delay in management plans and sometimes cause overtreatment. Clinical guidelines for the management of breast cancer in the UK recommend second read MRIs in at least 50% of patients. In this audit project, our aim is to correlate the MRALs reported in 2nd read breast MRIs (2bMRI) with the histopathological outcomes.
Method(s): The patients who were referred to 2bMRIs between July 2018 and August 2019 were retrieved from the archives. 86 consecutive patients (mean age: 54) were included in the audit. First read MRIs were correlated with 2bMRI results and noted as; agreed, a larger lesion (>1cm) or additional foci reported, a smaller lesion or fewer number of additional foci reported. According to histopathology reports MRALs were classified as; proved malignant, benign or not applicable.
Result(s): In 80% (69/86) of the patients the 2bMRI reports agreed with the first and the management did not change. In 20% there was disagreement. Five true positive cases benefited from more extensive surgery. Eight false positive cases ended up with more extensive surgery.
Conclusion(s): Referral indications were in accordance with the guidelines and 5.8% of the patients benefited from the 2bMRIs. However, a significant number of the patients did not benefit from the 2bMRIs. Larger studies are needed to see the true benefit of 2bMRIs as they have the potential to delay the patient pathway and increase anxiety levels of breast cancer patients.

Factors associated with physiotherapists’ preference for MRI in primary care patients with low back and leg pain (2018)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
*Ely S. ; Stynes S.; Ogollah R.; Foster N.E.; Konstantinou K.

Citation:
Musculoskeletal Science and Practice; Dec 2018; vol. 38 ; p. 46-52

Abstract:
Background: Criticisms about overuse of MRI in low back pain are well documented. Yet, with the exception of suspicion of serious pathology, little is known about factors that influence clinicians’ preference for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at first consultation. Objective: To explore factors associated with physiotherapists’ preference for MRI for patients consulting with benign low back and leg pain (LBLP) including sciatica. Design: Cross-sectional cohort study. Methods: Data were collected from 607 primary care LBLP patients participating in the ATLAS cohort study. Following clinical assessment, physiotherapists documented whether he/she wanted the patient to have an MRI. Factors potentially associated with physiotherapists’ preference for imaging were selected a priori from patient characteristics and clinical assessment findings. A mixed-effects logistic regression model examined the associations between these factors and physiotherapists’ preference for MRI. Results: Physiotherapists expressed a preference for MRI in 32% (196/607) of patients, of whom 22 did not have a clinical diagnosis of sciatica (radiculopathy). Factors associated with preference for MRI included; clinical diagnosis of sciatica (OR 4.23: 95% CI 2.29, 7.81), greater than 3 months pain duration (2.61: 1.58, 4.30), high pain intensity (1.24: 1.11, 1.37), patient’s low expectation of improvement (2.40: 1.50, 3.83), physiotherapist’s confidence in their diagnosis (1.19: 1.07, 1.33), with greater confidence associated with higher probability for MRI preference. Conclusion: A clinical diagnosis of sciatica and longer symptom duration were most strongly associated with physiotherapists’ preference for MRI. Given current best practice guidelines, these appear to be justifiable reasons for MRI preference at first consultation.

Magnetic resonance imaging for the diagnosis of vestibular schwannoma – Increasing cost-effectiveness and the diagnostic yield (2016)

Type of publication:
Conference abstract

Author(s):
Kumar S., Olaitan A., Danino J., Scott A.

Citation:
Otorhinolaryngologist, 2016, vol./is. 9/1(9-13)

Abstract:
Introduction: We aimed to assess whether MRI scans for screening of vestibular schwannoma (VS) are a cost effective tool and how best to maximise their positive yield. Materials and Methods: We undertook a retrospective analysis of 1000 scans to assess the diagnostic yield and the sensitivity and specificity of four published protocols Results: Of 756 patients included 8 patients were positively identified with a VS. If only patients who had either a 15dB or 20dB hearing loss at any single frequency underwent screening the number of negative scans would have been reduced by over 50%. No patients with unilateral tinnitus alone and normal hearing (8.6%) were diagnosed with VS. Discussion: To reduce the burden of MRI scans all departments should scan in accordance with a published protocol.