Oral and maxillofacial surgery patient satisfaction with telephone consultations during the COVID-19 pandemic (2020)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
*Horgan T.J.; *Alsabbagh A.Y.; *McGoldrick D.M.; *Bhatia S.K.; *Messahel A.

Citation:
British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery; 2020 [epub ahead of print]

Abstract:
Due to the COVID-19 pandemic most oral and maxillofacial surgical (OMFS) units have moved to conducting patient consultations over the telephone. The aim of this study was to assess patients’ satisfaction with telephone consultations during the COVID-19 pandemic. A retrospective survey was conducted of OMFS patients at our hospital who had telephone consultations between 1 April – 8 June 2020. The survey was conducted by independent interviewers and used the Generic Medical Interview Satisfaction Scale (G-MISS) along with a previously published additional questionnaire. Variables recorded included age, gender, theme of consultation, grade of clinician, and type of consultation. Statistical analysis was performed to assess for any differences between patient groups. The records of 150 consecutive patients were reviewed and 135 met inclusion criteria. A total of 109 patients completed the survey giving a response rate of 80.74%. The total G-MISS score for satisfaction was high, which indicates a high level of satisfaction among all patients. We found no statistical difference in satisfaction when comparing patients in terms of gender, age, theme of consultation, or level of clinician. A significant difference was found in compliance levels between review and new patients, with review patients demonstrating higher compliance levels (p=0.004). Overall, 83.48% of patients said they would be willing to have a telephone consultation in future. The majority of patients in this study reported high levels of satisfaction with telephone consultations. New patients reported lower levels of compliance which may suggest this type of consultation is less suited to telephone consultation.

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Benign thyroid swelling presenting as Horner’s syndrome (2020)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
*Shaji S.K.; *Chan J.; *Hari C

Citation:
BMJ Case Reports; Dec 2020; vol. 13 (no. 12).

Abstract:
Horner’s syndrome is a rare neurological condition seen in association with the disruption in the sympathetic nerve supply. Thyroid swelling is a common condition but rarely causes cervical sympathetic chain compression. We describe a case of a 54-year-old man who presented with Horner’s syndrome secondary to a benign thyroid nodule with pressure effect on the sympathetic chain. An association between thyroid pathologies and Horner’s syndrome has been mentioned previously, however, to our knowledge, this is the first case of Horner’s syndrome being the initial presentation for an underlying benign thyroid swelling.

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GLP-1 receptor agonists in type 2 diabetes: An underused asset? (2020)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
*Morris, David

Citation:
Journal of Diabetes Nursing; Aug 2020; vol. 24 (no. 5); p. 1-11

Abstract:
As our understanding of the incretin hormone system has increased, a number of drugs targeting this system
have been developed. The realisation of this potential has developed rapidly, and glucagon-like peptide-1
receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) are now a standard feature in management guidelines for type 2 diabetes. This
article reviews the operation of the incretin system and the mechanism by which GLP-1 RAs act to provide
benefit in type 2 diabetes. The availability and indications for use of the GLP-1 RAs, and their clinical benefits
and disadvantages, are summarised. The position of GLP-1 RAs in the management of type 2 diabetes is
discussed pragmatically, with reference to various key guidelines.

Managing diabetes during the COVID-19 pandemic (2020)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
*Morris, David

Citation:
Practice Nursing; Nov 2020; vol. 31 (no. 11); p. 450-455

Abstract:
People with diabetes are known to be more severely affected by COVID-19 than the general population. David
Morris provides an overview of how to manage the illness in this group The outbreak of a new viral infection in
Wuhan, a city in Habei Province, China, became evident in December 2019. For most individuals who contract
COVID-19 the disease is mild to moderate. Older people are disproportionately affected with serious disease,
while children appear less likely to experience serious illness. A number of conditions are linked to increased
severity of disease and poorer outcomes including both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. This article looks at why
those with diabetes are at higher risk, and how to manage diabetes during the pandemic.

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Cauda equina compression in metastatic prostate cancer (2020)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
*Siddiqui R.S.; *Cheruvu M.S.; *Ansari H.; *Van Liefland M.

Citation:
BMJ Case Reports; Dec 2020; vol. 13 (no. 12)

Abstract:
A 67-year-old man presented to his general practitioner with intermittent episodes of unilateral sciatica over a 2-month period for which he was referred for an outpatient MRI of his spine. This evidenced a significant lumbar vertebral mass that showed tight canal stenosis and compression of the cauda equina. The patient was sent to the emergency department for management by orthopaedic surgeons. He was mobilising independently, pain free on arrival and without neurological deficit on assessment. Clinically, this patient presented with no red flag symptoms of cauda equina syndrome or reason to suspect malignancy. In these circumstances, National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines do not support radiological investigation of the spine outside of specialist services. However, in this case, investigation helped deliver urgent care for cancer that otherwise may have been delayed. This leads to the question, do the current guidelines meet clinical requirements?

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Cardiovascular disease incidence in 21 years follow-up in severe and non-severe familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) : Data from the UK Simon Broome FH register (2020)

Type of publication:
Conference abstract

Author(s):
Iyen B.; Qureshi N.; Weng S.; Roderick P.; *Capps N.; Durrington P.; Mcdowell I.; Soran H.; Neil A.; Humphries S.E.

Citation:
Atherosclerosis; December 2020; vol. 315

Abstract:
Background: The Simon Broome (SB) FH register has previously reported a 2.2-fold higher Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) mortality in those with “severe-FH” (SFH) compared to “non-severe-FH” (NSFH). Here we examine CVD morbidity over 21 years follow-up, by linking the register participants with the UK secondary care Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) database.
Method(s): SFH and NSFH were as defined by the 2016 International Atherosclerosis Society criteria. Patients aged 20-79 years (52% female) were recruited from 21 UK lipid clinics and followed between 1997-2018. Outcomes analysed were composite CVD (first HES outcome of coronary heart disease (CHD), myocardial infarction, stable or unstable angina, stroke, TIA, PVD, heart failure, PCI and CABG) and then CVD subtypes. The excess Standardised Morbidity Ratio (SMbR) compared to an age-matched UK general practice sample was calculated (95% Confidence intervals).
Result(s): Of the 3553 SB register subjects, linkage with HES was available for 2988 (84%) participants, of whom 1,646 (66.7%) met the SFH definition. Overall the composite CVD SMbR was 6.55(6.20-6.92). In the SFH group (27,680 pyrs follow-up and 762 events) the SMbR for any CVD event was 9.38 (8.74-10.07), while in the NSFH group (13,750 pyrs follow-up and 237 events) was 5.87(5.17-6.67). For CHD the estimates were 11.88(11.01-12.82) vs 7.38(6.45-8.47) respectively.
Conclusion(s): CVD morbidity in conventionally treated FH patients was over 6-fold higher than the general population, with rates in those with SFH 60% higher than those with NSFH. This emphasises the potential value of more intensive lipid-lowering, and management of other risk factors for those with FH.