Effectiveness of a web-based virtual journal club to promote medical education (Web-Ed): protocol of a multicentre pragmatic randomised trial (2022)

Type of publication:Randomised controlled trial

Author(s):Michael Rimmer, Nagla Elfaki, Cheryl Dunlop, Damien Coleburt, Neil Cowan, Olivia Raglan, Jhia Jiat Teh, Maria Fisher, Sarah Mcrobbie, Nilaani Murugesu, Meera Ramcharn, Mohamed Abdelrahman, *Yazid Jibrel, *Matthew Wood, *William Parry-Smith, Bassel H Al Wattar

Citation:BMJ Open, 2022 Vol.12, Issue 6

Abstract:Introduction: A journal club (JC) is a commonly used medical educational tool. Videoconferencing technology can facilitate the delivery of JCs, however, there remains no evidence on the role of web-based virtual JCs in promoting the acquisition and retention of medical knowledge. The Web-Ed trial aims to evaluate the educational benefits, feasibility and acceptability of web-based virtual JCs compared with traditional face-to-face ones.

Methods and analysis: Web-Ed is a multicentre pragmatic parallel-group randomised trial across teaching hospitals within the UK National Health Service (NHS). We will enrol qualified doctors or medical students who are >18 years old, proficient in English and able to use online videoconferencing software. Block randomisation will be used to allocate participants in 1:1 ratio to either intervention group. Both groups will be presented with the same educational material and follow a standardised JC structure hosted by nominated moderators and medical faculty members.

The primary outcome is the difference in participants’ knowledge acquisition and retention 7 days after the JCs evaluated using standardised multiple-choice questions. We will report secondarily on the feasibility and acceptability of the JCs using Likert scale questionnaires. Assuming a 30% drop-out rate, we aim to enrol 75 participants to detect a 20% improvement in knowledge acquisition at 80% power and 5% significance. We will report using mean difference or risk ratio with 95% CIs and assess significance using parametric/non-parametric testing. Where relevant, we will adjust for predetermined characteristics (age, grade of training and session duration) using multivariate regression analyses.

Ethics and dissemination: Web-Ed was designed by doctors in training to address their learning needs and evaluate the preferred mode of learning. The trial results will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at relevant scientific conferences. The trial has been approved by the NHS Health Regulation Authority (21/HRA/3361).

Trial registration number: ISRCTN18036769.

Link to full-text [open access - no password required]

Altmetrics:

Stepped-wedge randomized controlled trial of laparoscopic ventral mesh rectopexy in adults with chronic constipation (2022)

Type of publication:Journal article

Author(s):Grossi U; *Lacy-Colson J; Brown SR; Cross S; Eldridge S; Jordan M; Mason J; Norton C; Scott SM; Stevens N; Taheri S; Knowles CH

Citation:Techniques in Coloproctology, 2022 May 19 [epub ahead of print]

Abstract:Background: The effectiveness of laparoscopic ventral mesh rectopexy (LVMR) in patients with defecatory disorders secondary to internal rectal prolapse is poorly evidenced. A UK-based multicenter randomized controlled trial was designed to determine the clinical efficacy of LVMR compared to controls at medium-term follow-up. Methods: The randomized controlled trial was conducted from March 1, 2015 TO January 31, 2019. A stepped-wedge RCT design permitted observer-masked data comparisons between patients awaiting LVMR (controls) with those who had undergone surgery. Adult participants with radiologically confirmed IRP refractory to conservative treatment were randomized to three arms with different delays before surgery. Efficacy outcome data were collected at equally stepped time points (12, 24, 36, 48, 60, and 72 weeks). Clinical efficacy of LVMR compared to controls was defined as ≥ 1.0-point reduction in Patient Assessment of Constipation-Quality of Life and/or Symptoms (PAC-QOL and/or PAC-SYM) scores at 24 weeks. Secondary outcome measures included 14-day diary data, the Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale (GAD-7), the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), St Marks incontinence score, the Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire (PISQ-12), the chronic constipation Behavioral Response to Illness Questionnaire (CC-BRQ), and the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (BIPQ).Results: Of a calculated sample size of 114, only 28 patients (100% female) were randomized from 6 institutions (due mainly to national pause on mesh-related surgery). Nine were assigned to the T0 arm, 10 to T12, and 9 to T24. There were no substantial differences in baseline characteristics between the three arms. Compared to baseline, significant reduction (improvement) in PAC-QOL and PAC-SYM scores were observed at 24 weeks post-surgery (- 1.09 [95% CI – 1.76, – 0.41], p = 0.0019, and – 0.92 [- 1.52, – 0.32], p = 0.0029, respectively) in the 19 patients available for analysis (9 were excluded for dropout [n = 2] or missing primary outcome [n = 7]). There was a clinically significant long-term reduction in PAC-QOL scores (- 1.38 [- 2.94, 0.19], p = 0.0840 at 72 weeks). Statistically significant improvements in PAC-SYM scores persisted to 72 weeks (- 1.51 [- 2.87, – 0.16], p = 0.0289). Compared to baseline, no differences were found in secondary outcomes, except for significant improvements at 24 and 48 weeks on CC-BRQ avoidance behavior (- 14.3 [95% CI – 23.3, – 5.4], and – 0.92 [- 1.52, – 0.32], respectively), CC-BRQ safety behavior (- 13.7 [95% CI – 20.5, – 7.0], and – 13.0 [- 19.8, – 6.1], respectively), and BIPQ negative perceptions (- 16.3 [95% CI – 23.5, – 9.0], and – 10.5 [- 17.9, – 3.2], respectively).Conclusions: With the caveat of under-powering due to poor recruitment, the study presents the first randomized trial evidence of short-term benefit of LVMR for internal rectal prolapse. Trial Registration: ISRCTN Registry (ISRCTN11747152)

Validation of the OAKS prognostic model for acute kidney injury after gastrointestinal surgery (2022)

Type of publication:Journal article

Author(s):STARSurg Collaborative and EuroSurg Collaborative (includes Chohan K.; Dhuna S.; Haq T.; Kirby S.; Lacy-Colson J.; Logan P.; Malik Q.; McCann J.; Mughal Z.; Sadiq S.; Sharif I.; Shingles C.; Simon A.; Chaudhury N.; Rajendran K.; Akbar Z.)

Citation:BJS Open, 2022, 6(1)

Abstract:Background: Postoperative acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication of major gastrointestinal surgery with an impact on short- and long-term survival. No validated system for risk stratification exists for this patient group. This study aimed to validate externally a prognostic model for AKI after major gastrointestinal surgery in two multicentre cohort studies. Method(s): The Outcomes After Kidney injury in Surgery (OAKS) prognostic model was developed to predict risk of AKI in the 7 days after surgery using six routine datapoints (age, sex, ASA grade, preoperative estimated glomerular filtration rate, planned open surgery and preoperative use of either an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or an angiotensin receptor blocker). Validation was performed within two independent cohorts: a prospective multicentre, international study ('IMAGINE') of patients undergoing elective colorectal surgery (2018); and a retrospective regional cohort study ('Tayside') in major abdominal surgery (2011-2015). Multivariable logistic regression was used to predict risk of AKI, with multiple imputation used to account for data missing at random. Prognostic accuracy was assessed for patients at high risk (greater than 20 per cent) of postoperative AKI. Result(s): In the validation cohorts, 12.9 per cent of patients (661 of 5106) in IMAGINE and 14.7 per cent (106 of 719 patients) in Tayside developed 7-day postoperative AKI. Using the OAKS model, 558 patients (9.6 per cent) were classified as high risk. Less than 10 per cent of patients classified as low-risk developed AKI in either cohort (negative predictive value greater than 0.9). Upon external validation, the OAKS model retained an area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUC) curve of range 0.655-0.681 (Tayside 95 per cent c.i. 0.596 to 0.714; IMAGINE 95 per cent c.i. 0.659 to 0.703), sensitivity values range 0.323-0.352 (IMAGINE 95 per cent c.i. 0.281 to 0.368; Tayside 95 per cent c.i. 0.253 to 0.461), and specificity range 0.881-0.890 (Tayside 95 per cent c.i. 0.853 to 0.905; IMAGINE 95 per cent c.i. 0.881 to 0.899). Conclusion(s): The OAKS prognostic model can identify patients who are not at high risk of postoperative AKI after gastrointestinal surgery with high specificity.

Link to full-text [open access - no password required]

A single faecal bile acid stool test demonstrates potential efficacy in replacing SeHCAT testing for bile acid diarrhoea in selected patients (2022)

Type of publication:Journal article

Author(s):Kumar A; Al-Hassi HO; Jain M; Phipps O; Ford C; Gama R; Steed H; *Butterworth J; McLaughlin J; Galbraith N; Brookes MJ; Hughes LE

Citation:Scientific Reports, 2022 May 18; Vol. 12 (1), pp. 8313

Abstract:This study examines the validity of measuring faecal bile acids (FBA) in a single stool sample as a diagnostic tool for bile acid diarrhoea (BAD) by direct comparison to the 75 selenium-homotaurocholic acid (SeHCAT) scan. A prospective observational study was undertaken. Patients with chronic diarrhoea (> 6 weeks) being investigated for potential BAD with SeHCAT scan provided stool samples for measurement of FBA, using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Patients were characterised into four groups: SeHCAT negative control group, post-cholecystectomy, idiopathic BAD and post-operative terminal ileal resected Crohn's disease. Stool samples were collected at baseline and 8-weeks post treatment to determine whether FBA measurement could be used to monitor therapeutic response. 113 patients had a stool sample to directly compare with their SeHCAT result. FBA concentrations (μmol/g) and interquartile ranges in patients in the control group (2.8; 1.6-4.2), BAD (3.6; 1.9-7.2) and post-cholecystectomy cohort 3.8 (2.3-6.8) were similar, but all were significantly lower (p < 0.001) compared to the Crohn's disease cohort (11.8; 10.1-16.2). FBA concentrations in patients with SeHCAT retention of < 15% (4.95; 2.6-10.5) and < 5% (9.9; 4.8-15.4) were significantly higher than those with a SeHCAT retention > 15% (2.6; 1.6-4.2); (p < 0.001 and p < 0.0001, respectively). The sensitivity and specificity using FBA cut-off of 1.6 μmol/g (using ≤ 15% SeHCAT retention as diagnostic of BAD) were 90% and 25% respectively. A single random stool sample may have potential use in diagnosing severe BAD or BAD in Crohn's patients. Larger studies are now needed to confirm the potential efficacy of this test to accurately diagnose BAD in the absence of SeHCAT testing.

Link to full-text [open access - no password required]

The positive impact of GIRFT (getting it right first time) on arthroplasty services in times of COVID-19 (2022)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
*Khan MM; *Khawar H; *Perkins R; Pardiwala A

Citation:
Annals of medicine and surgery, 2022 May; Vol. 77, pp. 103655

Abstract:
Background: This observational study evaluates the trends in arthroplasty services across National Health Services (NHS) following the COVID-19 pandemic about GIRFT (Getting it Right First Time) guidelines concerning National joint registry data (NJR data). Introduction: Since the advent of the COVID-19 crisis sustainability of elective arthroplasty services have become a burning question in NHS. Capacity crisis, unknown COVID-19 infection status, lack of ring-fenced beds, winter crisis, and unprecedented trauma have aggravated the situation further leading to severe impairment in quality of life and service provision. GIRFT guidelines have suggested a few solutions to this crisis and one of them is dividing the hospitals into Hot (trauma) and cold (elective) sites. Objectives: To review NJR data for pre and post COVID era along with the service structure of the hospital and test the hypothesis that whether redistribution of services into hot and cold sites is a possible solution for sustainable arthroplasty service across NHS. Methodology: A search was made into the NJR data from 2019, 2020, and 2021. The First 7 months were taken from each year I.e. From Ist January to 31st of July. A review of entries for arthroplasty was considered for all hospitals across England and Wales. Hospitals in Scotland, Ireland, and Isles of Man and major trauma centers were excluded. Any hospital that was recording at least 15 arthroplasty cases for 4 out of 7 months in 2021 was considered for review. A brief evaluation of their service structure was made, and hospitals were divided into Elective Centres (EC), Urgent Care Centres (UCC), and District General Hospitals (DGH) with in-house emergency services based on the information provided on their official website. In NJR data "completed operations by submission date" column was considered as a reference for data collection. A total of 1807, 1800, and 1810 were identified for 2019, 2020, and 2021 respectively. However, after applying inclusion criteria total number of entries was reduced to 120 hospitals. Data analysis and selection of hospitals were reviewed twice by two authors (MMK and AP) at different times to avoid any bias and reduce the chances of human error that can affect the outcome. A sub-analysis of data for the last 3 months (May, June, and July) was also performed for the respective years to get a better picture of arthroplasty trends and reduce the flaws of data interpretation. Ethical Approval and Data Consideration: A formal approval was taken from the NJR team in the UK before the data processing was initiated. The data source being used was available for public review on the NJR website. The team was happy for us to process and evaluate the data as per needs of our study. However, they requested a disclaimer and appreciation note for the members of the NJR team and hospital personnel across the UK that have made the provision of data and subsequent analysis leading to this study feasible. Results: 18 EC were included. The mean number of cases recorded per center was 427, 68, 348 for 2019, 2020, and 2021 respectively.20 UCC were identified. The mean number of cases performed were 213, 24, and 195 in 2019, 2020, and 2021 respectively. Similarly, 60 DGH with emergency services were included and the average number of cases recorded were 194, 27, and 166 for 2019, 2020, and 2021 respectively. Compared to 2019 out of 148 DGH in 2019 only 60 can provide a sustainable arthroplasty service signifying a drop of 40% in 2021 in the number of DGH which are contributing to elective services. Conclusions: The overall productivity of theatres in terms of arthroplasty services has decreased since the reinitialization of services in 2021. There is a need of hour to divide the services into hot and cold sites in terms of A/E and elective centers to provide safe and uninterrupted provision of arthroplasty services and address long waiting times for patients. Provisional of ring-fenced beds and arthroplasty wards is more technically feasible in centers that are not providing in-house emergency admission pathways or are specialist, dedicated elective centers

Link to full-text [open access - no password required]

Vesicourachal diverticulum (2022)

Type of publication:Journal article

Author(s):*Mohamed G; *Ghani Z; *Lynn N; *Masilamani M; *Rowlands J

Citation:Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England, 2022 Apr 21 [epub ahead of print]

Abstract:We report a rare complication involving a healthy 45-year-old male patient who underwent an emergency laparoscopic appendicectomy for acute perforated gangrenous appendicitis. The patient was catheterised pre- procedure and the ports were inserted under vision. Upon completion of the procedure, a 15 Fr Robinson drain was left in the pelvis and was fed through the suprapubic port hole. Postoperatively the patient developed worsening, generalised abdominal pain and high output from the drain. The patient was re-catheterised but the computed tomography (CT) cystogram did not show any injury to the bladder. The drain fluid creatinine was noted to be raised (>4,000), indicating that urine was leaking into the drain. Conventional cystogram confirmed a contrast leak from the dome around the drain. Flexible cystoscopy confirmed that the drain had transversed the vesicourachal diverticula. The drain was pulled back and converted to a suprapubic catheter with the patient subsequently being discharged. Vesicourachal diverticula is a rare and often asymptomatic anomaly. When undertaking laparoscopic surgery, precautions should be taken to prevent port site injury such as catheterising the patient to ensure the bladder is empty and inserting the ports under direct vision. It is safer to visualise muscle rather than peritoneum during port insertion. In this case, the bladder diverticula was noticed extraperitoneally. Though the indirect CT cystogram reported no injury, this was unreliable as the bladder was not distended which led to the subtle injury being missed. Traditional cystogram should be considered in cases with a negative CT cystogram and a strong suspicion of bladder injury.

Abiraterone acetate plus prednisolone for metastatic patients starting hormone therapy: 5-year follow-up results from the STAMPEDE randomised trial (2022)

Type of publication:Randomised controlled trial

Author(s):James N.D.; Clarke N.W.; Cook A.; Ali A.; Hoyle A.P.; Attard G.; Brawley C.D.; Chowdhury S.; Cross W.R.; Dearnaley D.P.; de Bono J.S.; Montana C.D.; Gilbert D.; Gillessen S.; Gilson C.; Jones R.J.; Langley R.E.; Malik Z.I.; Matheson D.J.; Millman R.; Parker C.C.; Pugh C.; Rush H.; Russell J.M.; Berthold D.R.; Buckner M.L.; Mason M.D.; Ritchie A.W.; Birtle A.J.; Brock S.J.; Das P.; Ford D.; Gale J.; Grant W.; Gray E.K.; Hoskin P.; Khan M.M.; Manetta C.; McPhail N.J.; O'Sullivan J.M.; Parikh O.; Perna C.; Pezaro C.J.; Protheroe A.S.; Robinson A.J.; Rudman S.M.; Sheehan D.J.; *Srihari N.N.; Syndikus I.; Tanguay J.; Thomas C.W.; Vengalil S.; Wagstaff J.; Wylie J.P.; Parmar M.K.; Sydes M.R.

Citation:International Journal of Cancer, 12 Apr 2022 [epub ahead of print]

Abstract:Abiraterone acetate plus prednisolone (AAP) previously demonstrated improved survival in STAMPEDE, a multi-arm, multi-stage platform trial in men starting long-term hormone therapy for prostate cancer. This long-term analysis in metastatic patients was planned for 3yrs after the first results. Standard-of-care (SOC) was androgen deprivation therapy. The comparison randomized patients 1:1 to SOC-alone with or without daily abiraterone acetate 1000mg+prednisolone 5mg (SOC+AAP), continued until disease progression. The primary outcome measure was overall survival. Metastatic disease risk group was classified retrospectively using baseline CT and bone scans by central radiological review and pathology reports. Analyses used Cox proportional hazards & flexible parametric models, adjusted for baseline stratification factors. 1003 patients were contemporaneously randomized (Nov-2011–Jan-2014): median age 67yr; 94% newly-diagnosed; metastatic disease risk group: 48% high, 44% low, 8% un-assessable; median PSA 97ng/mL. At 6.1yr median follow-up, 329 SOC-alone deaths (118 low-risk, 178 high-risk) and 244 SOC+AAP deaths (75 low-risk, 145 high-risk) were reported. Adjusted HR = 0.60 (95%CI:0.50-0.71; P =0.31×10-9 ) favoured SOC+AAP, with 5-yr survival improved from 41% SOC-alone to 60% SOC+AAP. This was similar in low-risk (HR = 0.55; 95%CI:0.41-0.76) and high-risk (HR = 0.54; 95%CI:0.43-0.69) patients. Median and current maximum time on SOC+AAP was 2.4yr and 8.1yr. Toxicity at 4yr post-randomisation was similar, with 16% patients in each group reporting grade 3 or higher toxicity. A sustained and substantial improvement in overall survival of all metastatic prostate cancer patients was achieved with SOC+abiraterone acetate + prednisolone, irrespective of metastatic disease risk group.

Link to full-text [open access - no password required]

Altmetrics:

Patient Outcomes Related to In-Hospital Delays in Appendicectomy for Appendicitis: A Retrospective Study (2022)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
Claydon O; Down B; *Kumar S

Citation:
Cureus, 2022 Mar 10; Vol. 14 (3), pp. e23034

Abstract:
Background and objective In many hospitals, the availability of operating theatres and access to senior surgical and anaesthetic support diminish during night hours. Therefore, urgent surgery is sometimes postponed until the following morning rather than performed overnight, if it is judged to be safe. In this study, we aimed to determine if a delay in laparoscopic appendicectomy in cases of acute appendicitis of over 12 hours, analogous to an overnight delay, correlated with worse patient outcomes. Our primary outcome was delayed discharge from the hospital. Our secondary outcomes were appendicitis severity, conversions, and postoperative complications. Methods We undertook a retrospective review of the medical records of patients who underwent laparoscopic appendicectomy for appendicitis at a UK district general hospital between 01/01/2018 and 30/08/2019. For each patient, clinical and demographic information, and time of hospital admission, surgery, and discharge were collected. Delayed discharge was defined as "time to discharge" >24 hours after surgery. Results A total of 446 patients were included in the study. In 137 patients (30.7%), "time to surgery" was under 12 hours; in 309 patients (69.3%) "time to surgery" was over 12 hours. Of note, 319 patients (71.5%) had a delayed discharge; 303 patients (67.9%) had complicated appendicitis, and 143 patients had severe appendicitis (32.1%). No statistically significant association between "time to surgery" and delayed discharge, appendicitis severity, conversion, or 30-day re-presentations was observed. Conclusion Time from admission to the start of appendicectomy did not affect patient outcomes. Short in-hospital delays in appendicectomy, such as an overnight delay, may be safe in certain patients and should be determined based on clinical judgement.

Link to full-text [open access - no password required]

Endoscopically assisted reconstruction of chronic Achilles tendon ruptures and re-ruptures using a semitendinosus autograft is a viable alternative to pre-existing techniques (2022)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
Nilsson N; Gunnarsson B; *Carmont MR; Brorsson A; Karlsson J; Nilsson Helander K

Citation:
Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy : official journal of the ESSKA, 2022 Apr 09 [epub ahead of print]

Abstract:
Purpose: Achilles tendon ruptures are termed chronic after a delay in treatment for more than 4 weeks. The literature advocates surgical treatment with reconstruction to regain ankle push-off strength. The preferred technique is, however, still unknown and is often individualized. This study aims to present the technique and clinical outcome of an endoscopically assisted free semitendinosus reconstruction of chronic Achilles tendon rupture and Achilles tendon re-ruptures with delayed representation. It is hypothesized that the presented technique is a viable and safe alternative for distal Achilles tendon ruptures and ruptures with large tendon gaps.
Method: Twenty-two patients (13 males and 9 females) with a median (range) age of 64 (34-73) treated surgically with endoscopically assisted Achilles tendon reconstruction using a semitendinosus autograft were included. The patients were evaluated at 12 months post-operatively for Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS), calf circumference, Achilles Tendon Resting Angle (ATRA), heel-rise height and repetitions together with tendon length determined by ultrasonography, concentric heel-rise power and heel-rise work.
Results: The patients reported a median (range) ATRS of 76 (45-99) out of 100. The median (range) ATRA on the injured side was 60° (49°-75°) compared with 49.5° (40-61°), p < 0.001, on the non-injured side. Eighteen out of 22 patients were able to perform a single-leg heel-rise on the non-injured side. Sixteen patients out of those 18 (89%) were also able to perform a single heel-rise on the injured side. They did, however, perform significantly lower number of repetitions compared with the non-injured side with a median (range) heel-rise repetitions of 11 (2-22) compared with 26 (2-27), (p < 0.001), and a median (range) heel-rise height of 5.5 cm (1.0-11.0 cm) compared with 9.0 cm (5.0-11.5 cm), (p < 0.001). The median calf circumference was 1.5 cm smaller on the injured side, 37.5 cm compared with 39 cm, when medians were compared. The median (range) tendon length of the injured side was 24.8 cm (20-28.2 cm) compared with 22 cm (18.4-24.2 cm), (p < 0.001), on the non-injured side.
Conclusion: The study shows that endoscopically assisted reconstruction using a semitendinosus graft to treat chronic Achilles tendon ruptures and re-ruptures with delayed representation produces a satisfactory outcome. The technique can restore heel-rise height in patients with more distal ruptures or large tendon defects and is therefore a viable technique for Achilles tendon reconstruction.
Level of Evidence: IV.

Establishment of virtual fracture clinic in Princess Royal Hospital Telford: Experience and recommendations during the first 9 months (2022)

Type of publication:
Conference abstract

Author(s):
*Khaleeq T.; *Lancaster P.; *Fakoya K.; *Ferreira P.; *Ahmed U.

Citation:
British Journal of Surgery. Conference: ASiT Surgical Innovation Summit – Future Surgery Show. London United Kingdom. 109(SUPPL 1) (pp i13), 2022. Date of Publication: March 2022.

Abstract:
Introduction: Virtual fracture clinics (VFC) have been shown to be a safe and cost-effective way of managing outpatient referrals to the orthopaedic department. During the coronavirus pandemic there has been a push to reduce unnecessary patient contact whilst maintaining patient safety. Method(s): A protocol was developed by the clinical team on how to manage common musculoskeletal presentations to A&E prior to COVID as part of routine service development. Patients broadly triaged into 4 categories; discharge with advice, referral to VFC, referral to face to face clinic or discussion with on call team. The first 9 months of data were analysed to assess types of injury seen and outcomes. Result(s): In total 2489 patients were referred to VFC from internal and external sources. 734 patients were discharged without follow-up and 182 patients were discharged for physiotherapy review. Only 3 patients required admission. Regarding follow-ups, 431 patients had a virtual follow-up while 1036 of patients required further face to face follow up. 87 patients were triaged into subspecialty clinics. 37 patients were felt to have been referred inappropriately. Conclusion(s): BOA guidelines state all patients must be reviewed within 72 hours of their orthopaedic injury. Implementation of a VFC allows this target to be achieved and at the same time reduce patient contact. Almost half the patients were discharged following VFC review, the remaining patients were followed up. This is especially relevant in the current pandemic where reducing unnecessary trips to hospital will benefit the patient and make the most of the resources available.

Link to full-text [no password required]