Domiciliary NIV (DOMNIV) in a real world setting: A retrospective study in a District General Hospital (2019)

Type of publication:
Conference abstract

Author(s):
*Craik S.; *Nasir A.; *Ali A.; *Moudgil H.; *Srinivasan K.; *Makan A.; *Crawford E.; *Wilson J.; *John N.; *Ahmad N.

Citation:
Thorax; Dec 2019; vol. 74 (Suppl 2).

Abstract:
Introduction: DomNIV in patients with chronic Type 2 respiratory failure results in improved survival. HOT-HMV study produced encouraging results in patients with COPD treated with home oxygen and DomNIV. [Murphy et al, JAMA, 317(21), 2177-2186] DomNIV usage with or without oxygen has been prevalent in our hospital setting over for 10 years. Objective Our primary aim was to look at the indications for prescription of DomNIV in our local hospital. Our secondary aim was to look at overall unadjusted mortality in this cohort and in particular any relationship with different types of oxygen provision.
Methods: We collected data on all patients who have received DomNIV from 2008-2018 with or without oxygen prescription from our local database. Data on mortality was obtained from our Clinical Portal. We used MS Excel and Vassar stats (http://vassarstats.net/) for statistical analysis.
Results: 105 patients commenced DomNIV; 60% were female with a mean (SD) age of 61 (13) years. Indications were Obesity hypoventilation (OH), Overlap syndrome, COPD, Neuromuscular disease, Bronchiectasis and others. 40% of patients did not receive oxygen with DomNIV (wO2), 36% received long term oxygen therapy (LTOT), 15% received overnight oxygen (OO2) and the rest received PRN oxygen. 43% of patients (N=45) died during the study period, of these 40% (N=18) died within the first 12 months. 29% died with LTOT versus 17% wO2 and 0% with OO2 in the first 12 months. This was statistically significant between LTOT and OO2 groups: RR 0.71 (95% CI 0.58-0.87), and also between wO2 and OO2 groups: RR 0.83 (95% CI 0.72- 0.95).
Conclusion: Majority of patients received DomNIV treatment for OH; 36% (N=38) had received long term oxygen therapy (LTOT) along with DomNIV; Patients receiving overnight oxygen with DomNIV survived longer compared to those who had it as LTOT or who didn’t have any oxygen at all.

Link to full-text [NHS OpenAthens account required]

Quality improvement project for emergency oxygen delivery on a respiratory ward (2016)

Type of publication:
Conference abstract

Author(s):
*Hutchinson K.E.; *Craik S.; *Srinivasan K.; *Moudgil H.; *Ahmad N.

Citation:
Thorax; Dec 2016; vol. 71, Supplement 3

Abstract:
Background British Thoracic Society (BTS) guidelines state that oxygen should be used to treat hypoxaemia and prescribed to a target saturation range.1 Patients at risk of type 2 respiratory failure should target 88-92%, with the rest 94-98%. In the BTS national audit in 2013, out of 6214 patients, 55% had oxygen prescribed and 52% were prescribed and delivered to within a target saturation range.2 Methods We ran a Quality Improvement Project (QIP) involving three PDSA cycles to improve the delivery of oxygen to patients on the Respiratory Ward at the Princess Royal Hospital, Telford. We set our standards as: 1. 90% of patients receiving oxygen have it prescribed on a drug chart 2. 100% of patients prescribed oxygen have a documented target saturation range 3. 100% of patients have oxygen delivered appropriately to target The QIP process
commenced in Autumn 2015. After the first cycle we used bedside prompt cards and delivered teaching sessions with doctors, nurses and healthcare assistants (HCAs). After the second cycle we appointed a nurse, HCA and two FY1 doctors as ‘O2 Ninjas’. Data were collected at three points after each cycle from drug charts and VitalPaC. Results See Table (Table Presented) Conclusions Our QIP shows that education and empowerment of ‘grass root’ healthcare workers can improve oxygen prescription on a Respiratory ward. We suggest this QIP is replicated in other trusts and specialties to improve safe oxygen delivery.

Improving Oxygen Delivery on Wards (2017)

Type of publication:
Post on the Academy of Fab NHS Stuff website

Author(s):
Nawaid Ahmad

Full text:
Oxygen (O2) is a drug and should be prescribed if administered to a patient. The British Thoracic Society has published guidelines on emergency oxygen delivery and a recent audit showed that out of 100 patients on O2, 42 did not have a written order.

Cycle 1: 2 FY1s collected data on O2 prescription and delivery on the respiratory ward at the Princess Royal Hospital, a part of the Shrewsbury and Telford Hospital NHS trust. At our trust, O2 is prescribed on the patient’s drug chart and saturation targets are mentioned on the prescription. 61% patients on O2 had a written order and 58% had the target mentioned along with the prescription.

Cycle 2: After the data collection, we started doing face to face education about O2 prescription in the acute medical unit and the respiratory ward. We targeted the Drs, nurses and the health care assistants. This was done for a week. A prompt card was developed (Pic 1) which was attached next to the O2 delivery system on the wall to prompt nurses to get the O2 prescribed. A card mentioning O2 targets was attached to the board above the patients bed. Another data collection was done a month later which showed that O2 prescription rates had gone up to 79% and 77% had a target mentioned.

Cycle 3: This involved forming an O2 team comprising the 2FY1s, one staff nurse and one healthcare assistant from the ward. They are called ‘O2 Ninjas’ and wear a badge (Pic 2). Their main role now will be to continue the education of all staff, each at their own level. We plan to roll out an educational programme through the trust staff education department and teach using scenarios. The idea is to spread this process to other specialties within the trust. Work is on going.

Our Motto: “ An idea needs to become a movement, for change to happen”

Link to more details or full-text: http://fabnhsstuff.net/2017/05/27/improving-oxygen-delivery-wards/