Do the heel-rise test and isometric strength improve after Achilles tendon repair using Dresden technique? (2021)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
De la Fuente, Carlos; Henriquez, Hugo; *Carmont, Michael R; Huincahue, Javiera; Paredes, Tamara; Tapia, María; Araya, Juan Pablo; Díaz, Nicolás; Carpes, Felipe P

Citation:
Foot and ankle surgery : official journal of the European Society of Foot and Ankle Surgeons; Jan 2021 [epub ahead of print]

Abstract:
BACKGROUND Achilles’ tendon ruptures result in impaired plantar flexion strength and endurance. It is interesting to know the plantar flexion strength, the number of heel-rise repetitions, and the maximal calf circumference following Achilles’ tendon ruptures repair. METHODS Both the injured and non-injured legs of thirty male patients with Achilles’ tendon ruptures treated with the percutaneous Dresden technique were compared with the ankle function of 30 healthy participants. Rehabilitation involved partial weight-bearing for three weeks and then increased to full weight-bearing and ankle exercises. RESULTS The injured legs had weaker plantar flexion strength (1.64 ± 0.17 Nm/kg) compared with the non-injured legs (1.91 ± 0.24 Nm/kg; p = 0.002) and the healthy participants’ legs (1.93 ± 0.32 Nm/kg; p < 0.001). The non-injured leg had greater ability in doing heel-rise repetitions (39.4 ± 6.1 rep.) compared with the injured legs (37.2 ± 5.7 rep.; p < 0.023) and the healthy participants’ legs (31.0 ± 13.0 rep.; p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS The injured leg had not recovered full isometric strength but had improved heel-rise repetition.

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The reliability, reproducibility and utilization of the radiographic Achilles Tendon Loading Angle in the management of Achilles Tendon rupture (2020)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
*Carmont M.R.; *Littlehales J.; Brorsson A.; Karlsson J.; Nilsson-Helander K.; Barfod K.W.; Ginder L.

Citation:
Foot and Ankle Surgery; 2020 Oct 3;S1268-7731

Abstract:
Background: During management of Achilles tendon rupture, determination of tendon-end approximation, either clinically or by ultrasound is difficult, following brace application of during loading. The Radiographic Achilles Tendon Loading Angle (RadATLA) is proposed as a method of measuring ankle position whilst loading in a brace during the management of Achilles tendon rupture. This study aims to determine the reliability and reproducibility of the RadATLA. Method(s): A loaded true lateral ankle radiograph including the fifth metatarsal head was taken when wearing a brace at the 6-week time point in 18 patients (19 ankles). following Achilles tendon repair or reconstruction. The RadATLA was compared with the Tibio-talar angle, other radiographic and clinical measures used to quantify foot and ankle position during the first 6 weeks of early rehabilitation in a resting position and during loading. Result(s): The intra-rater reliability of both angles was found to be good (>0.8). The RadATLA was found to have an excellent intra-rater reliability with Intra-class correlation of (ICC) 0.992-0.996 (95%CI 0.889-0.999), standard error of the measurement (SEM) 1.03-3.65 and Minimal Detectable Change (MDC) 2.86-10.12. The inter-rater reliability was good with ICC of 0.798-0.969 (95%CI-0.03 to 0.964), SEM 2.9-7.6, and MDC 8.1-20.9. The RadATLA loaded at 6 weeks in all patients was at mean (SD) (range) 41.9 (16.5), (18.5-75.9). There was a significant difference between the patients in the Repair group compared with patients in the Reconstruction group both in RadATLA loaded at 6 weeks: 35.6 (11.2), (18.5-56.5) versus 55.5 (19), (20-75.9), (p = 0.01). The amount loaded in all patients was at mean (SD) (range) 29.2Kg (17.7), (2-56) and the percentage Body Weight was 30.7% (19), (2.1-63.2). There were no differences between the groups neither in amount loaded nor in percentage Body weight (p = 0.614-0.651). Conclusion(s): The RadATLA is a reliable and reproducible angle and can be used to determine the position of the ankle, when loaded in a brace during rehabilitation following Achilles tendon rupture.

Minimising negative ankle and foot X-rays in the Emergency Department-Are the Ottawa ankle rules good enough? (2014)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
*Crosswell S, *Leaman A, *Phung W

Citation:
Injury, 12 2014, vol./is. 45/12(2002-4), 0020-1383;1879-0267 (2014 Dec)

Abstract:
OBJECTIVES: To review fracture rates in patients who had X-rays of either the ankle or foot or both in the Emergency Department of a district hospital.METHOD: A retrospective review of 2589 Emergency Department patients who had X-rays of the ankle or foot or both over a 12-month period.RESULTS: There were 1199 ankle X-rays taken of which 193 (16%) showed a significant fracture. There were 1081 patients who had a foot X-rayed of which 165 (15%) showed a significant fracture. Younger patients had more X-rays but older patients were more likely to have a fracture. There were 309 patients who had an ipsilateral ankle and foot X-rayed at the same time, and of these 42 (14%) showed one fracture and just two (0.6%) showed a significant fracture of both ankle and foot.CONCLUSIONS: The approach to X-raying ankle and feet in this study is probably widespread, and Ottawa Ankle Rules still seem to be of limited use in diagnosing fractures. This low yield of positive X-ray could be accepted or a more sophisticated ankle rule introduced. Copyright 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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