Oral and maxillofacial surgery patient satisfaction with telephone consultations during the COVID-19 pandemic (2020)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
*Horgan T.J.; *Alsabbagh A.Y.; *McGoldrick D.M.; *Bhatia S.K.; *Messahel A.

Citation:
British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery; 2020 [epub ahead of print]

Abstract:
Due to the COVID-19 pandemic most oral and maxillofacial surgical (OMFS) units have moved to conducting patient consultations over the telephone. The aim of this study was to assess patients’ satisfaction with telephone consultations during the COVID-19 pandemic. A retrospective survey was conducted of OMFS patients at our hospital who had telephone consultations between 1 April – 8 June 2020. The survey was conducted by independent interviewers and used the Generic Medical Interview Satisfaction Scale (G-MISS) along with a previously published additional questionnaire. Variables recorded included age, gender, theme of consultation, grade of clinician, and type of consultation. Statistical analysis was performed to assess for any differences between patient groups. The records of 150 consecutive patients were reviewed and 135 met inclusion criteria. A total of 109 patients completed the survey giving a response rate of 80.74%. The total G-MISS score for satisfaction was high, which indicates a high level of satisfaction among all patients. We found no statistical difference in satisfaction when comparing patients in terms of gender, age, theme of consultation, or level of clinician. A significant difference was found in compliance levels between review and new patients, with review patients demonstrating higher compliance levels (p=0.004). Overall, 83.48% of patients said they would be willing to have a telephone consultation in future. The majority of patients in this study reported high levels of satisfaction with telephone consultations. New patients reported lower levels of compliance which may suggest this type of consultation is less suited to telephone consultation.

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Coronavirus Disease 2019: the Pivotal Role of UK Clinical Oncology and the UK Coronavirus Cancer Monitoring Project (2021)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
*Best ; Starkey, T.; *Chatterjee, A.; Fackrell, D.; *Pettit, L.; *Srihari, N.; Tween, H.; Olsson-Brown, A.; Cheng, V.; Hughes, D.J.; Lee, A.J.X.; Purshouse, K.; Arnold, R.; UK Coronavirus Cancer Monitoring Project Team; Sivakumar, S.; Cazier, J.-B.; Lee, L.Y.W.

Citation:
Clinical Oncology; Jan 2021; vol. 33 (no. 1)

Abstract:

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Managing diabetes during the COVID-19 pandemic (2020)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
*Morris, David

Citation:
Practice Nursing; Nov 2020; vol. 31 (no. 11); p. 450-455

Abstract:
People with diabetes are known to be more severely affected by COVID-19 than the general population. David
Morris provides an overview of how to manage the illness in this group The outbreak of a new viral infection in
Wuhan, a city in Habei Province, China, became evident in December 2019. For most individuals who contract
COVID-19 the disease is mild to moderate. Older people are disproportionately affected with serious disease,
while children appear less likely to experience serious illness. A number of conditions are linked to increased
severity of disease and poorer outcomes including both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. This article looks at why
those with diabetes are at higher risk, and how to manage diabetes during the pandemic.

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Lessons of the month: Co-infection with SARS-CoV-2 and influenza B virus in a patient with community-acquired pneumonia (2020)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
*Coutinho A.; *Riaz A.; *Makan A.; *Crawford E.; *Dev D.; *Srinivasan K.; *Ahmad N.; *Moudgil H.

Citation:
Clinical medicine (London, England); Nov 2020; vol. 20 (no. 6); e262–3

Abstract:
Why we only infrequently detect or report two or more respiratory viruses co-infecting an adult host is poorly understood. We report a rare case where influenza B and SARS-CoV-2 caused viral pneumonia in a 74-year-old man diagnosed during the UK winter epidemic/pandemic for these organisms and discuss concepts of co-infection.

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Emotional Resilience and Bariatric Surgical Teams: a Priority in the Pandemic (2020)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
Graham, Yitka; Mahawar, Kamal; *Riera, Manel; Islam, Omar; Bhasker, Aparna Ghovil; Wilson, Michael; Tahrani, Abd; Moize, Violeta; Leal, Angela; Hayes, Catherine

Citation:
Obesity surgery; Nov 2020 [epub ahead of print]

Abstract:
The infection control measures implemented as a result of COVID-19 led to a postponement of bariatric surgical procedures across many countries worldwide. Many bariatric surgical teams were in essence left without a profession, with many redeployed to other areas of clinical care and were not able to provide the levels of patient support given before COVID-19. As the pandemic continues, some restrictions have been lifted, with staff adjusting to new ways of working, incorporating challenging working conditions and dealing with continuing levels of stress. This article explores the concept of emotional labour, defined as ‘inducing or suppressing feelings in order to perform one’s work’, and its application to multidisciplinary teams working within bariatric surgery, to offer insight into the mental health issues that may be affecting healthcare professionals working in this discipline.

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Managing hyperlipidaemia in patients with COVID-19 and during its pandemic: An expert panel position statement from HEART UK (2020)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
Iqbal Z.; Ho J.H.; France M.; Schofield J.; Nicholson K.; Soran H.; Adam S.; Durrington P.; Syed A.; Neely D.; Rees A.; Payne J.; Khatib R.; Cegla J.; Byrne C.; Qureshi N.; *Capps N.; Ferns G.; Datta D.; Pottle A.; Halcox J.; Krentz A.

Citation:
Atherosclerosis; Nov 2020; vol. 313 ; p. 126-136

Abstract:
The emergence of the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) which causes Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) has resulted in a pandemic. SARS-CoV-2 is highly contagious and its severity highly variable. The fatality rate is unpredictable but is amplified by several factors including advancing age, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension and obesity. A large proportion of patients with these conditions are treated with lipid lowering medication and questions regarding the safety of continuing lipid-lowering medication in patients infected with COVID-19 have arisen. Some have suggested they may exacerbate their condition. It is important to consider known interactions with lipid-lowering agents and with specific therapies for COVID-19. This statement aims to collate current evidence surrounding the safety of lipid-lowering medications in patients who have COVID-19. We offer a consensus view based on current knowledge and we rated the strength and level of evidence for these recommendations. Pubmed, Google scholar and Web of Science were searched extensively for articles using search terms: SARS-CoV-2, COVID-19, coronavirus, Lipids, Statin, Fibrates, Ezetimibe, PCSK9 monoclonal antibodies, nicotinic acid, bile acid sequestrants, nutraceuticals, red yeast rice, Omega-3-Fatty acids, Lomitapide, hypercholesterolaemia, dyslipidaemia and Volanesorsen. There is no evidence currently that lipid lowering therapy is unsafe in patients with COVID-19 infection. Lipid-lowering therapy should not be interrupted because of the pandemic or in patients at increased risk of COVID-19 infection. In patients with confirmed COVID-19, care should be taken to avoid drug interactions, between lipid-lowering medications and drugs that may be used to treat COVID-19, especially in patients with abnormalities in liver function tests.

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Paediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome temporally associated with SARS-CoV-2 (PIMS-TS): providing resuscitative care (2020)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
*Kempsell-Smith M.; *Meenan S.

Citation:
Nursing children and young people; 2020 Sep 10;32(5):13-16

Abstract:
Little is understood about severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. Furthermore, there is limited literature available and few case studies exploring the observations of colleagues involved in managing patients with COVID-19. Children represent a small sample of the confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the UK but the reasons for this are relatively unknown. Most children are asymptomatic or exhibit mild symptoms from COVID-19 infection. However, a small number have been identified who develop a significant systemic inflammatory response, referred to as paediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome temporally associated with SARS-CoV-2 (PIMS-TS). PIMS-TS involvespersistent fever and organ dysfunction. PIMS-TS can also share clinical features with other conditions including toxic shock syndrome, septic shock and Kawasaki disease. This article presents a case study to explore the resuscitative care provided to a ten-year-old child with suspected PIMS-TS.

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Lessons of the month 1: A case of rhombencephalitis as a rare complication of acute COVID-19 infection (2020)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
*Po Fung Wong, *Sam Craik, *Piers Newman, *Annabel Makan, *Koottalai Srinivasan, *Emma Crawford, *Devapriya Dev, *Harmesh Moudgil and *Nawaid Ahmad

Citation:
Clinical Medicine 2020 Vol 20, No 3, p. 293-294

Abstract:
A 40-year-old man developed acute brainstem dysfunction 3 days after hospital admission with symptoms of the novel SARS-CoV-2 infection (COVID-19). Magnetic resonance imaging showed changes in keeping with inflammation of the brainstem and the upper cervical cord, leading to a diagnosis of rhombencephalitis. No other cause explained the patient’s abnormal neurological findings. He was managed conservatively with rapid spontaneous improvement in some of his neurological signs and was discharged home with continued neurology follow up.

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Point-of-care lung ultrasound in patients with COVID-19 – a narrative review (2020)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
Smith, M J; Hayward, S A; Innes, S M; *Miller, A S C

Citation:
Anaesthesia; Aug 2020, vol. 75 (no. 8); p. 1096-1104

Abstract:
Ultrasound imaging of the lung and associated tissues may play an important role in the management of patients with COVID-19-associated lung injury. Compared with other monitoring modalities, such as auscultation or radiographic imaging, we argue lung ultrasound has high diagnostic accuracy, is ergonomically favourable and has fewer infection control implications. By informing the initiation, escalation, titration and weaning of respiratory support, lung ultrasound can be integrated into COVID-19 care pathways for patients with respiratory failure. Given the unprecedented pressure on healthcare services currently, supporting and educating clinicians is a key enabler of the wider implementation of lung ultrasound. This narrative review provides a summary of evidence and clinical guidance for the use and interpretation of lung ultrasound for patients with moderate, severe and critical COVID-19-associated lung injury. Mechanisms by which the potential lung ultrasound workforce can be deployed are explored, including a pragmatic approach to training, governance, imaging, interpretation of images and implementation of lung ultrasound into routine clinical practice.

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