Management of mid-urethral tape complications: a retrospective study (2020)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
Offiah I.; *Rachaneni S.; Dua A.

Citation:
Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology of India; Apr 2020; vol. 70 (no. 2); p. 152-157

Abstract:
Background/purpose of the study: Following mid-urethral tape insertion, for stress urinary incontinence (SUI), a proportion of women experience complications such as voiding dysfunction or tape erosion which fail to respond to conservative management approaches. These women thus require further surgical treatment. Our objective was to describe the outcomes of the surgical management of complications in these women. Method(s): This retrospective study describes the results obtained following the surgical management of mid-urethral tape complications. Twenty-nine consecutive women who required mid-urethral tape lysis, loosening or excision for tape-related complications in the period 2007-2017 were included. Primary outcomes were improvement in voiding dysfunction and resolution of pain, while secondary outcomes were evaluation of the recurrence of stress urinary incontinence and patient satisfaction. Patient outcomes were measured using the Patient Global Impression of Improvement questionnaire. Result(s): There were 1459 mid-urethral tape procedures performed in the study period. Twenty-nine women (1.99%) who had revision surgery for tape complication were identified. Interventions included tape loosening or lysis in 19 women and tape excision in ten women. Twenty-three of the 29 patients reported a significant improvement in their symptoms postoperatively. Two women had a recurrence of SUI in the tape excision cohort; all patients following tape loosening or lysis remained continent. Conclusion(s): Tape revision surgery is a safe and effective treatment for mid-urethral tape complications with the majority of women maintaining continence following revision. Early intervention and proactive management of complications, by the appropriate specialist, will improve outcomes.

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Expansile Endocervical Crypt Involvement by CIN2-3 as a Risk Factor for High Grade Cytology Recurrence after Cold Coagulation Cervical Treatment (2020)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
*Papoutsis D.; *Underwood M.; *Parry-Smith W.; *Panikkar J.; *Williams J.

Citation:
Geburtshilfe und Frauenheilkunde; Sep 2020; vol. 80 (no. 9); p. 891-895

Abstract:
Introduction: To determine whether expansile endocervical crypt involvement (ECI) on pretreatment cervical punch biopsies is a risk factor for high grade cytology recurrence in women following cold coagulation for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN).Materials and Methods: This was a secondary analysis on the results of an observational study of women who had a single cold coagulation cervical treatment between 2001–2011 and who were followed up for cytology recurrence. Women with a previous cervical treatment were excluded.
Results: 559 women were identified with a mean age of 28.7 ± 6.2 years. Expansile and non-expansile ECI were identified in 5.4 and 4.3% of women, respectively. The proportion of women with high grade cytology recurrence was 10% for those with expansile ECI and 2.3% for those without. Multivariate analysis showed that women with expansile ECI when compared to those without, had a four-fold greater risk for high grade cytology recurrence (HR = 4.22; 95% CI: 1.10–16.29, p = 0.036). There was no significant association found between non-expansile ECI and overall or high grade cytology recurrence. The increased biopsy depth and the CIN3 grade of pretreatment cervical punch biopsies were significantly associated with greater odds for the detection of expansile ECI. We calculated that the optimal-cut off of pretreatment cervical punch biopsy depth for the detection of expansile ECI was 4 mm (sensitivity: 73.3%; specificity: 55.1%).
Conclusions: Expansile ECI is a risk factor that increases the likelihood of high grade cytology recurrence following cold coagulation. Deeper pretreatment cervical punch biopsies need to be taken so as not to miss expansile ECI prior to ablative treatment.

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A case series of vulvar Paget’s disease in women from two different clinical settings (2019)

Type of publication:
Conference abstract

Author(s):
*Papoutsis D.; Borella F.

Citation:
Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease; Oct 2019; vol. 23 (no. 4S):S37-S81

Abstract:
Objectives: Vulvar Paget’s disease (VPD) is an extremely rare neoplasm that accounts for less than 1% of vulvar pre-malignancies/malignancies. We present four cases of women diagnosed with VPD.
Method(s): The databases of two tertiary hospitals (one in the United Kingdom and one in Italy) were searched for cases of VPD and information was retrieved. We present the clinical manifestation and management of four cases of VPD.
Result(s): The first case involved a 77-year old woman with vulvar soreness for more than two months unresponsive to topical antifungals. On examination a 2 cm velvety-red colored left labial lesion was noted. Due to the small-sized lesion she was offered vulvar surgery and at follow-up she has no signs of recurrence. The second case involved a 62-year old woman with a history of stage T1b breast cancer. She presented with a 5×3 cm left labial lesion that extended to the perianal areas. Due to the large lesion size she was offered topical
imiquimod and at follow-up she has no recurrence. The third case involved a 62-year old woman presenting with vulvar itching for about 18 months. She had a previous history of colon cancer that was surgically treated. She underwent wide local excision of the vulvar lesion that measured 5 cm . Due to VPD recurrence after 4 months she was further treated with imiquimod and at follow-up she is disease-free. The fourth case involved a 64-year old woman complaining of vulvar itching and burning for about 8 months. She was initially treated with
imiquimod but due to disease persistence she had a hemivulvectomy. At follow-up she has signs of VPD but declines any other treatment.
Conclusion(s): We report four cases of VPD. The clinical features of VPD were similar and the treatment was dictated by the vulvar lesion size, the multidisciplinary team consensus, and the patient’s choice.

A 5-year follow-up of vulval swelling due to extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma: A rare case report (2019)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
O’Neill D.; El-Ghobashy A.; Elghobashy M.; Abdelsalam H.; *Metelko M.

Citation:
Molecular and Clinical Oncology; May 2019; vol. 10 (no. 5); p. 483-486

Abstract:
Vulval extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma (EMC) is a rare cause of vulval swelling, reported <10 times in the literature to date. EMC in this location is frequently misdiagnosed due to its rarity, and patients may incur delays in diagnosis and treatment. We herein present the diagnosis and management of the case of vulval EMC in a 42-year-old Caucasian female patient who presented in 2011 with a swelling on the right labium majus. The tumour was initially misdiagnosed as a Bartholin’s cyst and managed conservatively. The tumour was ultimately diagnosed as EMC and treated by radical surgical excision and adjuvant radiotherapy. The aim of the present study was to report the results after a long-terms follow-up period and review the available relevant literature.

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Lymphangioma circumscriptum of the vulva clinical picture and surgical management (2018)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
*Papoutsis D.; Haefner H.K

Citation:
Archives of Hellenic Medicine 35(6):809-810 · November 2018

Abstract:
Vulvar lymphangioma circumscriptum is a rare entity that may mimic many other diseases of the vulva. It presents with the non-specific symptoms of persistent vulvar itching and soreness, and the diagnosis is confirmed through vulvar biopsy. Surgical treatment has the lowest recurrence rates compared with other treatment modalities. The case is presented here of a woman diagnosed with lymphangioma circumscriptum of the vulva and its surgical management.

Audit of 2-week wait referrals to the Gynecology Department in District General Hospital and investigating patient awareness of the reasons and importance behind the referral (2018)

Type of publication:
Conference abstract

Author(s):
Wilkinson M.; *Sahu B

Citation:
BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology; Dec 2018; vol. 125 ; p. 48

Abstract:
Introduction Two-week wait referrals to gynecology services are at a premium with pressure on numbers. Referrals can be inappropriate. Patients are often unaware the appointment is for suspected cancer. Methods Two-week wait referrals were examined during a six month period. The gynecologist in clinic collected data. Patients were asked about their 2-week wait referral, gauging awareness around their referral. Clinical symptoms and signs were compared to those in referral. Appropriateness of the referral was assessed by symptoms fitting the 2-week wait criteria or clinical findings on referral not consistent with the presenting symptoms and findings in clinic. Results A total of 172 patients were referred under the 2-week wait criteria; mean age was 58 years, range (17-95). Referrals were from 50 separate primary care practices. Suspected cancer referrals were composed of 111 endometrial, 15 ovarian, 22 cervical, 15 vulva/vaginal and 9 of mixed pathology. There was awareness of referral for cancer in 90 cases (52%), awareness of “2-week wait” in 124 cases (72%) and aware that the appointment could be at either hospital within the trust in 96 cases (56%). The referral was considered appropriate for 2-week wait referral in 123 (72%) of cases. Conclusion The majority of patients were referred correctly. A wide range of pathologies was seen. A significant number could have been referred as routine referrals or advice requested. Patient awareness of it being a referral due to suspected cancer was poor with better appreciation of the urgency of referral.

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The paediatrician and the management of common gynaecological conditions (2018)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
*Ritchie, Joanne K; Latthe, Pallavi; Jyothish, Deepthi; Blair, Joanne C

Citation:
Archives of disease in childhood; Jul 2018, 103(7), p. 703-706

Abstract:
Paediatric gynaecology is an emerging discipline. Since 2000, there has been an advanced training programme in paediatric gynaecology available for obstetric and gynaecology trainees; additionally, a set of clinical standards1 for the care of paediatric and adolescent patients has been developed by The British Society of Paediatric and Adolescent Gynaecology (BritSPAG). BritSPAG is a multidisciplinary group of professionals including gynaecologists, paediatricians, paediatric urologists and endocrinologists.Girls with gynaecological conditions are often seen in general paediatric services; it is important that those assessing them are confident in identifying patients who require more specialist care. Despite this, gynaecology does not appear in the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health curriculum. This article aims to increase the knowledge base and confidence of paediatricians in dealing with common paediatric and adolescent gynaecological conditions.

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Psychosexual outcomes in women of reproductive age at more than two-years from excisional cervical treatment – a cross-sectional study (2019)

Type of publication:
Journal article

Author(s):
Sparić, Radmila; *Papoutsis, Dimitrios; Kadija, Saša; Stefanović, Radomir; *Antonakou, Angeliki; Nejković, Lazar; Kesić, Vesna

Citation:
Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology; Apr 2019; vol. 40 (no. 2); p. 128-137

Abstract:
PURPOSE To investigate the long-term psychosexual outcomes in women following excisional cervical treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS Women with cold-knife conization (CKC) or large loop excision of the transformation zone (LLETZ) treatment were interviewed after a follow-up colposcopy visit. Their demographics, treatment and psychosexual characteristics were recorded. RESULTS One hundred and forty six women with a mean age of 35.2 ± 5.4 years underwent either LLETZ (68.5%) or CKC (31.5%) treatment within 4.7 ± 2.7 years (range: 2-15) before the interview. 27.4% of women were less interested in sexual intercourse following treatment in comparison with their interest before. Those women with less interest in sexual intercourse after treatment had higher anxiety and depression scores and were more worried about disease progression. Women with post-treatment complications were at risk of less interest in sexual intercourse and of greater anxiety and depression. Women with abnormal smears at follow-up were at risk of greater anxiety. The type of treatment and grade of dysplasia did not affect their interest in sexual intercourse or the anxiety and depression scores. CONCLUSIONS Approximately, one-third of women at more than two years posttreatment may suffer from less interest in sexual intercourse, have relatively greater anxiety and depression, and might still be concerned about the possibility of disease progression.

A national colposcopy survey comparing destructive versus excisional treatment for CIN (2016)

Type of publication:
Conference abstract

Author(s):
Parry-Smith W., *Papoutsis D., Parris D., *Panikkar J., Redman C., *Underwood M.

Citation:
BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, June 2016, vol./is. 123/(99)

Abstract:
Introduction Women found to have high grade CIN should be offered either ablative treatment or large loop excision of the transformation zone with appropriate biopsy. Objective 1) To learn if a trial of ablative versus excisional treatment would be supported by fellow colposcopists in the UK 2) To investigate the current practice amongst colposcopists with regards to ablative treatment for high grade CIN 3) To gain an understanding of aspects of practice such as use of local anaesthetic during punch biopsies Methods An electronic questionnaire was sent to all registered colposcopists in the United Kingdom (total = 1677). Of these, 325 responded (19%). The study was granted ethical approval by the council of the British Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (BSCCP). Results The majority of colposcopists n = 248 (76%) felt that a study investigating the morbidity and Test of Cure outcomes comparing excisional and destructive treatments was needed. A reduced complication and morbidity rate would be the greatest factor to encourage colposcopists to use destructive treatments more often n = 250 (76.92%). If a destructive treatment were found to have a significantly reduced complication, morbidity, and equal or higher patient satisfaction rate during the procedure, but resulted in a slightly higher need for further treatment 5%, this was acceptable to n = 140 (43.1%) of those surveyed. However, a further treatment rate of 2.5% was acceptable to n = 196 (60.1%). The majority n = 182 (56%) of colposcopists did not perform destructive treatments for high grade disease; For those who did not perform destructive treatments the main reason was that they were not aware of sufficient evidence for its use n = 98 (30.2%) and had no experience nor training n = 33 (10.25%). Cold coagulation was the most common destructive treatment n = 100 (31%) that colposcopists could perform, with diathermy n = 70 (22%), laser n = 11 (3.4%) and cryotherapy n = 10 (3.1%) being less prevalent. The majority of colposcopists took two punch biopsies per patient n = 190 (58.5%), with only n = 45 (13.8%) taking three or more biopsies. Silver nitrate was the most favoured haemostatic technique following punch biopsy n = 217 (66.7%), with n = 269 (87.1%) using no local analgesia. Conclusion A study investigating morbidity and Test of Cure of excisional compared with destructive treatments for high grade CIN would be supported by most participating colposcopists. Variation in practice regarding both treatment and diagnosis exists. This has quality assurance implications for a standardised national screening programme.

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